sidelong

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

1520s, from Middle English sidlyng (early 14th century), from side + -lyng ((frequentative)) (modern English -le ((frequentative))). Reanalyzed as side +‎ long.[1]

AdjectiveEdit

sidelong (not comparable)

  1. Directed to the side; sideways.
    He cast me a sidelong glance.
  2. Slanting or sloping; oblique.
  3. Indirect; suggestive; not straightforward.
    She made some sidelong remarks about his manhood.
  4. Along the side of something.
    • 1961 February, “Talking of Trains: Collision at Newcastle”, in Trains Illustrated, page 76:
      The passenger train was signalled from one of the west end bay platforms along the Down South Line; as it passed through a crossover to the Up South Line the freight train, which had been travelling slowly to the Up South Line, over-ran the signal protecting the crossover and came into sidelong collision with it.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdverbEdit

sidelong (comparative more sidelong, superlative most sidelong)

  1. Towards the side; sideways.
  2. obliquely

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2023), “sidelong”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

AnagramsEdit