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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

1690s, from Middle English sidlyng (early 14th century), as side + -lyng (frequentative suffix) (modern English side +‎ -le (frequentative suffix)).[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sidle (plural sidles)

  1. A sideways movement.
  2. A furtive advance.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

sidle (third-person singular simple present sidles, present participle sidling, simple past and past participle sidled)

  1. To move sideways.
  2. To advance in a furtive, coy or unobtrusive manner.
    • 1960, P. G. Wodehouse, Jeeves in the Offing, chapter VIII:
      At an early point in these exchanges I had started to sidle to the door, and I now sidled through it, rather like a diffident crab on some sandy beach trying to avoid the attentions of a child with a spade.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ sidle” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2018.

AnagramsEdit