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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

The verb is from side +‎ -le (frequentative suffix), possibly a back-formation from sideling (in a sidelong direction; askew, obliquely, adverb), treating that word as the present participle of sidle.[1]

The noun is derived from the verb.[2]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sidle (plural sidles)

  1. An act of sidling.
    1. A sideways movement.
    2. A furtive advance.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

sidle (third-person singular simple present sidles, present participle sidling, simple past and past participle sidled)

  1. (transitive, intransitive, also figuratively) To (cause something to) move sideways. [from late 17th c.]
  2. (transitive, intransitive, also figuratively) In the intransitive sense often followed by up: to (cause something to) advance in a coy, furtive, or unobtrusive manner.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ sidle, v.”, in OED Online  , Oxford: Oxford University Press, March 2016; “sidle” (US) / “sidle” (UK) in Oxford Dictionaries, Oxford University Press.
  2. ^ sidle, n.”, in OED Online  , Oxford: Oxford University Press, March 2016.

AnagramsEdit