See also: skó and -sko

BiakEdit

PronounEdit

sko

  1. third person trial pronoun, the three of them

DanishEdit

 
sko

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /sɡoːˀ/, [sɡ̊oːˀ], [sko̝ˀ]

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse skór, from Proto-Germanic *skōhaz, of unclear etymology; possibly a derivative of *skehaną (to move quickly), from Proto-Indo-European *skek- (to move quickly, jump).

NounEdit

sko c (singular definite skoen, plural indefinite sko)

  1. shoe
InflectionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse skoa.

VerbEdit

sko (imperative sko, infinitive at sko, present tense skor, past tense skoede, perfect tense har skoet)

  1. to shoe (to put horseshoes on a horse)

Further readingEdit


GaroEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Sino-Tibetan *m/s-gaw.

NounEdit

sko

  1. (anatomy) head

ReferencesEdit

  • Burling, R. (2003) The Language of the Modhupur Mandi (Garo) Vol. II: The Lexicon[1], Bangladesh: University of Michigan
  • Mason, M.C. (1904) , English-Garo Dictionary, Mittal Publications, New Delhi, India
  • Garo-Hindi-English Learners' Dictionary, North-Eastern Hill University Publications, Shillong

IcelandicEdit

AdverbEdit

sko

  1. used when giving an explanation, you see, see here, so, now
    Sko, ég verð upptekinn næstu daga en verð laus um helgina.Here's the situation: I'll be busy the next few days but I'm free during the weekend.
    Ég verð sko upptekinn á morgun.You see, I'll be busy tomorrow.
  2. filler word, often used for hesitation, you know, like
    Mér finnst þetta sko ekkert sérstaklega skemmtilegt.I, like, don't think this is very fun.
    Synonym: hérna

InterjectionEdit

sko

  1. look!, look at that! (often implies awe)
    Sko skipið!Wow, would you look at that ship!
    Nei sko!Wow!
  2. used to acknowledge that someone has done well
    Sko þig.Would you look at that, you did quite well!

Derived termsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse skór, from Proto-Germanic *skōhaz, of unclear etymology; possibly a derivation from *skehaną (to move quickly), from Proto-Indo-European *skek- (to move quickly, jump).

NounEdit

sko m (definite singular skoen, indefinite plural sko, definite plural skoa or skoene)

  1. a shoe

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

sko (imperative sko, present tense skor, simple past skodde, past participle skodd)

  1. to shoe

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

Etymology 1Edit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

From Old Norse skór, from Proto-Germanic *skōhaz, of unclear etymology; possibly a derivation from *skehaną (to move quickly), from Proto-Indo-European *skek- (to move quickly, jump). Cognate with English shoe.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sko m (plural skoen)

  1. a shoe
InflectionEdit
Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

sko (present tense skor, past tense skodde, past participle skodd/skott, passive infinitive skoast, present participle skoande, imperative sko)

  1. (transitive) to shoe
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Origin unknown, though possibly related to skade (damage, injury). The verb may be influenced by Etymology 1.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sko (masculine and feminine sko, neuter skott, definite singular and plural sko or skoe, comparative skoare, indefinite superlative skoast, definite singular skoaste)

  1. greedy

VerbEdit

sko (present tense skor, past tense skodde, past participle skodd/skott, passive infinitive skoast, present participle skoande, imperative sko)

  1. to take, grasp greedily
  2. to long for

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse skór, from Proto-Germanic *skōhaz, of unclear etymology; possibly a derivation from *skehaną (to move quickly), from Proto-Indo-European *skek- (to move quickly, jump).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /skuː/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uː

NounEdit

sko c

  1. a shoe (on foot or on a horse)
  2. a lining (of iron on a wooden tool; similar to a horseshoe)

DeclensionEdit

Declension of sko 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative sko skon skor skorna
Genitive skos skons skors skornas

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

sko (present skor, preterite skodde, supine skott, imperative sko)

  1. to shoe, to put on shoes; especially on a horse
    Han bygger sitt hus själv, förfärdigar sina kläder, bakar sitt bröd, brygger sitt öl, smider sin spik, skor sina hästar, förfärdigar sina vagnar
    He builds his own house, manufactures his own clothes, bakes his own bread, brews his own beer, forges his own hammernails, shoes his own horses, builds his own waggons
    Passade fötterna se’n i värmande strumpor af svart ull, Skodde sig snabbt, steg opp, tog fårskinnspelsen af väggen,
    Fit he then his feet in warming socks of black wool, shod himself quickly, stood up, took the sheep fur coat off the wall
  2. to line an object with a protection against wear
    • 1862, Hagberg, translation of Shakespeare, King John, II, 2.
    Nu får väl döden sko sin käft med stål
    O, now doth Death line his dead chaps with steel;
  3. (reflexive) to profit, to earn an undue profit (enough to buy shoes for oneself)
    William hade skott sig på Hörnerska konkursen och var således en »klok» man som åtnjöt aktning och förtroende
    William had made a profit from Hörner's bankruptcy and was thus a »wise» man who enjoyed respect and trust
    Medan bolag och partiledare skodde sig, voro stadens gator illa stenlagda, smutsiga och dåligt upplysta
    While corporations and party officials earned well, the city's streets were lacking in pavement, dirty and poorly lit

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit