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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English slendre, sclendre, from Old French esclendre (thin, slender), from Old Dutch slinder (thin, lank), from Proto-Germanic *slindraz (sliding, slippery), from Proto-Indo-European *sleydʰ- (to slip). Cognate with Bavarian Schlenderling (that which dangles), German schlendern (to saunter, stroll), Dutch slidderen, slinderen (to wriggle, creep like a serpent), Low German slindern (to slide on ice). More at slide, slither.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

slender (comparative slenderer, superlative slenderest)

  1. Thin; slim.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 3, in The China Governess[1]:
      Sepia Delft tiles surrounded the fireplace, their crudely drawn Biblical scenes in faded cyclamen blending with the pinkish pine, while above them, instead of a mantelshelf, there was an archway high enough to form a balcony with slender balusters and a tapestry-hung wall behind.
    A rod is a long slender pole used for angling.
  2. (figuratively) meagre; deficient
    Being a person of slender means, he was unable to afford any luxuries.
  3. (Gaelic languages) Palatalized.

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