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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French solidarité (solidarity), from solidaire (characterized by solidarity), from Latin solidum (whole sum), neuter of solidus (solid).

NounEdit

solidarity (countable and uncountable, plural solidarities)

  1. (countable) A bond of unity or agreement between individuals, united around a common goal or against a common enemy, such as the unifying principle that defines the labor movement; mutual support within a group.
    A long time union member himself, Phil showed solidarity with the picketing grocery store workers by shopping at a competing, unionized store.
    • 2012, Francesca Valensise, From Building Fabric to City Form: Reconstruction in Calabria at end of Eighteenth Century[1], Gangemi Editore spa, →ISBN, page 8:
      As a matter of fact the Enlightment culture was based on a philosophy inspired to an ethical laicism whose aim was to create a better society based on principles such as solidarity, equality of rights and duties, and full freedom.
  2. (uncountable) Willingness to give psychological and/or material support when another person is in a difficult position or needs affection.
    Only the solidarity provided by her siblings allowed Margaret to cope with her mother's harrowing death.

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