somewhat

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (British, dialectal) summat (and variants listed there)

EtymologyEdit

some +‎ what

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

somewhat (not comparable)

  1. (degree) To a limited extent or degree.
    The crowd was somewhat larger than expected, perhaps due to the good weather.
    The decision to shave or not is a somewhat personal one.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 2, in The Celebrity:
      I had occasion […] to make a somewhat long business trip to Chicago, and on my return […] I found Farrar awaiting me in the railway station. He smiled his wonted fraction by way of greeting, […], and finally leading me to his buggy, turned and drove out of town. I was completely mystified at such an unusual proceeding.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

PronounEdit

somewhat

  1. (archaic) Something.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.12:
      Proceeding to the midst he stil did stand, / As if in minde he somewhat had to say […].
    • (Can we date this quote by Robert Trail and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      But this text and theme I am upon, relates to somewhat far higher and greater, than all the beholdings of his glory that ever any saint on earth received.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling:
      Mr Jones had somewhat about him, which, though I think writers are not thoroughly agreed in its name, doth certainly inhabit some human breasts []
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby-Dick:
      Not seldom in this life, when, on the right side, fortune's favourites sail close by us, we, though all adroop before, catch somewhat of the rushing breeze, and joyfully feel our bagging sails fill out.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

somewhat (countable and uncountable, plural somewhats)

  1. More or less; a certain quantity or degree; a part, more or less; something.
    • (Can we date this quote by Grew and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      These salts have somewhat of a nitrous taste.
    • (Can we date this quote by Dryden and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Somewhat of his good sense will suffer, in this transfusion, and much of the beauty of his thoughts will be lost.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling. In Six Volumes, volume (please specify |volume=I to VI), London: Printed by A[ndrew] Millar, [], OCLC 928184292:
      To these ladies a man often recommends himself while he is commending another woman; and, while he is expressing ardour and generous sentiments for his mistress, they are considering what a charming lover this man would make to them, who can feel all this tenderness for an inferior degree of merit. Of this, strange as it may seem, I have seen many instances besides Mrs Fitzpatrick, to whom all this really happened, and who now began to feel a somewhat for Mr Jones, the symptoms of which she much sooner understood than poor Sophia had formerly done.
    • 1885, Richard F. Burton, The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Night 558:
      Then they set somewhat of food before me, whereof I ate my fill, and gave me somewhat of clothes wherewith I clad myself anew and covered my nakedness; after which they took me up into the ship, []
  2. A person or thing of importance; a somebody.
    • (Can we date this quote by Samuel Taylor Coleridge and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Pity that the researchful notary has not either told us in what century, and of what history, he was a writer, or been simply content to depose, that Lollius, if a writer of that name existed at all, was a somewhat somewhere.
    • (Can we date this quote by Tennyson and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Here come those that worship me. / They think that I am somewhat.