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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English um, from Old Norse um, umb (around, about), from Proto-Germanic *umbi (around), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂m̥bʰi (round about, around). Cognate with Old English ymbe (around), West Frisian om (around), Dutch om (around), German um (around). More at umbe.

PrepositionEdit

um

  1. Alternative form of umbe
Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Onomatopoeic.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌm (when stressed, or as a verb)

Used in rhotic dialects. Compare to British English erm.

InterjectionEdit

um

  1. Expression of confusion or space filler in conversation. See uh.
    Um, I don’t know.
    Let’s see... um... how about this?
    • 2002, Newsweek (volume 140, page lxxx)
      It's a great test of the claims of open-source gurus, who say that a self-motivated community can outcode any team working for a single employer—like, um, Microsoft.
  2. (chiefly US) Dated spelling of mmm.
    • 1963, Kurt Vonnegut, Cat's Cradle, Dell Publishing Co., Inc., page 65:
      "About the same, wherever you go," he agreed.
      "Um," I said.

VerbEdit

um (third-person singular simple present ums, present participle umming, simple past and past participle ummed)

  1. (intransitive) To make the um sound to express confusion or hesitancy.

Etymology 3Edit

A Latin-script rendering of µm.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

um (plural um)

  1. Alternative spelling of µm

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

um m

  1. skill, art

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

  • um in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • um in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

East MakianEdit

NounEdit

um

  1. house

ReferencesEdit

  • C. L. Voorhoeve, The Makian Languages and Their Neighbours (1982)

ElfdalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse um, from Proto-Germanic *umbi. Cognate with Swedish om.

ConjunctionEdit

um

  1. if

PrepositionEdit

um

  1. around
  2. about (a subject)

FaroeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse umb, from Proto-Germanic *umbi, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂m̥bʰi (round about, around).

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

um

  1. (with accusative) around
  2. (with accusative) about
  3. (with accusative) during
  4. (with accusative) through
  5. (with accusative) over

ConjunctionEdit

um

  1. whether, if

GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • umb (obsolete)

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German umbi, from Proto-Germanic *umbi, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂m̥bʰi (round about, around).

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

um

  1. (with accusative) about, used with es geht
    Es geht um den Kuchen.It's about the pie.
  2. (with accusative) around
    Um die Ecke
    around the corner
  3. (with accusative) At when relating to time (because the hands of a clock go around, the clock)
    Um acht Uhr reisen wir ab
    At eight o’clock we depart

ConjunctionEdit

um (introduces a zu-clause)

  1. in order to, so as to
    Wir sind gekommen, um zu helfen.
    We have come (in order) to help.

AdjectiveEdit

um (not comparable)

  1. (predicative, not attributive) up, in the sense of finished
    Werden dich in kurzem binden/ Erdgeist, deine Zeit ist um (Friedrich von Hardenberg, Novalis)
    We will shortly bind you/ Erdgeist, your time is up

AdverbEdit

um

  1. around, about
  2. turned over, changed, from one state to another

IcelandicEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse um, from Proto-Germanic *umbi (around, about).

AdverbEdit

um

  1. used in set phrases
    Það er um að gera að sofa vel.
    The important thing to do is to sleep well.
    Hvað er um að vera?
    What's going on?
    Eins og um var talað.
    As was agreed.

Derived termsEdit

PrepositionEdit

um

  1. (with accusative) about, concerning
    Um hvað ertu að tala?
    What are you talking about?
    Spurning um líf og dauða.
    A question of life and death.
  2. (with accusative) through, around, across
    Áin rennur um dalinn.
    The river runs through the valley.
    Að fara út um gluggann.
    To go out through the window.
    Vestur um haf.
    West across the sea.
  3. (with accusative) throughout, over, around
    Við förum um alla sveitina.
    We'll go throughout the district.
    Hann var breiður um herðar.
    He was broad across the shoulders.
    Hún hafði klút um hálsinn.
    She had a scarf around her neck.
  4. (with accusative) during, for, in, at
    Hvenær gerðist þetta? - Þetta gerðist um sumarið.
    When did this happen? - It happened during the summer.
    Ég fór um nóttina.
    I went during the night.
  5. (with accusative) approximately, about, around
    Pokinn er um fjórir kíló.
    The bag around four kilos.

Usage notesEdit

  • Often used with phrases such as "brjóta heilann um".
    Ég er búinn að brjóta heilann um þetta alla nótt!
    I've been racking my brain about this all night!

Derived termsEdit


Indo-PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese um (a), from Old Portuguese ũu, from Latin ūnus, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos.

ArticleEdit

um

  1. a (the indefinite article)
    • 1883, Hugo Schuchardt, Kreolische Studien, volume 3:
      Um homm tinh doiz filh:
      A man had two sons:

IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *ambi, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂m̥bʰi (round about, around).

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

um (plus dative, triggers lenition, does not mutate b, m, or p)

  1. about
  2. at

InflectionEdit

Further readingEdit


KhasiEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably cognate to U ʔóm.

NounEdit

um

  1. water

ReferencesEdit

  • H. Roberts, A Grammar of the Khasi Language

LatinEdit

LivonianEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

u'm

  1. 1st person singular present indicative form of vȱlda
  2. 3rd person singular present indicative form of vȱlda

LuxembourgishEdit

ContractionEdit

um

  1. contraction of op + dem; on the, at the, to the
  2. contraction of un + dem

Norwegian NynorskEdit

PrepositionEdit

um

  1. form removed with the spelling reform of 1938; superseded by om

Old NorseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *umbi (around, about). Cognate with Old English ymbe, Old Frisian umbe, ombe, Old Saxon umbi, Old High German umbi.

PrepositionEdit

um

  1. (with accusative) about, concerning
  2. (with accusative) round, past, beyond
  3. (with accusative) over, across, along
  4. (with accusative) during, at a point in time
  5. (with accusative) because of, for

DescendantsEdit

  • Danish: om
  • Elfdalian: um
  • Faroese: um
  • Icelandic: um
  • Norwegian: om
  • Swedish: om

ReferencesEdit

  • um in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Pennsylvania GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare German um, Dutch om, Old English ymb.

PrepositionEdit

um

  1. around

PortugueseEdit

Portuguese cardinal numbers
 <  0 1 2  > 
    Cardinal : um
    Ordinal : primeiro
Portuguese Wikipedia article on um

Alternative formsEdit

  • hum (obsolete)

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese ũu (one; a), from Latin ūnus (one), from Old Latin oinos, from Proto-Italic *oinos, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos (one).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈũ]
  • Hyphenation: um
  • Rhymes:

NumeralEdit

um m (feminine uma)

  1. one
    Uma xícara de caféOne cup of coffee

QuotationsEdit

For usage examples of this term, see Citations:um.

ArticleEdit

um m (feminine uma, masculine plural uns, feminine plural umas)

  1. (indefinite) a, an
    Um carro, uma casa.A car, a house.
    • 2005, Lya Wyler (translator), J. K. Rowling (English author), Harry Potter e o Enigma do Príncipe (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince), Rocco, page 186:
      Tenho um recado para você.
      I have a message for you.
    • 2005, Lya Wyler (translator), J. K. Rowling (English author), Harry Potter e o Enigma do Príncipe (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince), Rocco, page 361:
      [] disse o professor com um sorrisinho []
      [] the teacher said with a little smile []
    1. (in the plural) some; a few (a small number of)
      Uns carros, umas casas.A few cars, a few houses.
      Synonyms: alguns
    2. (with uncountable nouns) a bit of
      Comi uma pipoca antes de dormir.
      I ate a bit of popcorn before going to sleep.
      Synonyms: um pouco de
    3. (usually in the feminine, pronounced slowly, emphatically and with a high intonation) indicates that what follows is exceptional; quite a; quite the
      Ontem de noite caiu uma chuva.
      We had quite a rain last night.
      Estamos comendo um churrasco.
      We are having the barbecue.
      Synonyms: aquele

QuotationsEdit

For usage examples of this term, see Citations:um.

See alsoEdit

Portuguese articles (edit)
Singular Plural
Masculine Feminine Masculine Feminine
Definite articles
(the)
o a os as
Indefinite articles
(a, an; some)
um uma uns umas

NounEdit

um m (plural uns)

  1. The figure or digit "1": one.
    O um parece o sete sem gravata no pescoço.The one looks like the seven with no tie at its neck.

QuotationsEdit

For usage examples of this term, see Citations:um.

PronounEdit

um

  1. a person; one; someone
    Chegou-me um e disse: "Olá!"One came to me and said: "Hello!"
  2. Element(s) of a previously mentioned class: one; some (in plural).
    Comprei uns e me decepcionei.I bought some and got disappointed.

QuotationsEdit

For usage examples of this term, see Citations:um.


RomanschEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin homō, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰmṓ (earthling)

NounEdit

um m (plural umens)

  1. man
  2. husband

Coordinate termsEdit


SawaiEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

um

  1. house

Further readingEdit

  • Donald A. Burquest, Wyn D. Laidig, Phonological Studies in Four Languages of Maluku (1992)

ScotsEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

um

  1. (South Scots, personal) him

See alsoEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *umъ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ȗm m (Cyrillic spelling у̑м)

  1. mind
  2. intellect
  3. wit

DeclensionEdit


SlovakEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *umъ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

um m (genitive singular umu, nominative plural umy, genitive plural umov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. mind
  2. intellect
  3. wit

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • um in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk