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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English suþwind, corresponding to south + wind.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

south wind (plural south winds)

  1. A wind blowing from the south. [from 10th c.]
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.4:
      The watry Southwinde, from the seabord coste / Upblowing, doth disperse the vapour lo'ste, / And poures it selfe forth in a stormy showre [...].
    • 2010, Stephen Lee, The Guardian, 10 Dec 2010:
      Snow-melting south winds and rain below 2,400m have marred much of the fantastic early-season base and created off-piste avalanche risk.

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