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See also: vènt

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Partly from Old French vent, from Latin ventus and partly from French éventer.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vent (plural vents)

 
A vent (opening) in the wall of a house.
  1. An opening through which gases, especially air, can pass.
    the vent of a cask; the vent of a mould
  2. A small aperture.
    • Shakespeare
      Look, how thy wounds do bleed at many vents.
    • Alexander Pope
      Long 'twas doubtful, both so closely pent, / Which first should issue from the narrow vent.
  3. The opening of a volcano from which lava flows.
  4. A verbalized frustration.
  5. The excretory opening of lower orders of vertebrates.
  6. A slit in the seam of a garment.
  7. The opening at the breech of a firearm, through which fire is communicated to the powder of the charge; touchhole.
  8. In steam boilers, a sectional area of the passage for gases divided by the length of the same passage in feet.
  9. Opportunity of escape or passage from confinement or privacy; outlet.
  10. Emission; escape; passage to notice or expression; publication; utterance.
    • Milton
      without the vent of words
    • Shakespeare
      Thou didst make tolerable vent of thy travel.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

VerbEdit

vent (third-person singular simple present vents, present participle venting, simple past and past participle vented)

  1. (intransitive) To allow gases to escape.
    The stove vents to the outside.
  2. (transitive) To allow to escape through a vent.
    Exhaust is vented to the outside.
  3. (transitive, intransitive) To express a strong emotion.
    He vents his anger violently.
    Can we talk? I need to vent.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling
      He inveighed against the folly of making oneself liable for the debts of others; vented many bitter execrations against the brother; and concluded with wishing something could be done for the unfortunate family.
    • 2013 June 18, Simon Romero, "Protests Widen as Brazilians Chide Leaders," New York Times (retrieved 21 June 2013):
      But the demonstrators remained defiant, pouring into the streets by the thousands and venting their anger over political corruption, the high cost of living and huge public spending for the World Cup and the Olympics.
  4. To snuff; to breathe or puff out; to snort.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Clipping of ventriloquism

NounEdit

vent (plural vents)

  1. Ventriloquism.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

French vente, from Latin vendere (to sell).

NounEdit

vent

  1. sale; opportunity to sell; market
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shelton to this entry?)
    • Sir W. Temple
      There is no vent for any commodity but of wool.

VerbEdit

vent (third-person singular simple present vents, present participle venting, simple past and past participle vented)

  1. To sell; to vend.
    • Sir Walter Raleigh
      Therefore did those nations vent such spice.

Etymology 4Edit

Spanish venta (a poor inn, sale, market). See vent (sale).

NounEdit

vent (plural vents)

  1. (obsolete) A baiting place; an inn.

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Provençal vent, from Latin ventus, from Proto-Italic *wentos, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂wéh₁n̥ts < *h₂weh₁- (to blow).

NounEdit

vent m (plural vents)

  1. wind (movement of air).

Related termsEdit


DanishEdit

VerbEdit

vent

  1. imperative of vente

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch vent (hero; man). Unknown earlier origin. Compare West Frisian feint (servant; fellow; boyfriend).

  • Possibly from Proto-Germanic *fanþijô (walker, walking), from Proto-Indo-European *pent-, *penth- (to go, pass). This would make it related to Dutch vinden (to find; (archaic) to explore) and cognate to Old High German fendo (footsoldier) and Old English fēþa (footsoldier). The expected descendant in Dutch would have been vend(e), which existed in Middle Dutch as vende (pawn in a chess game; farmer). Final-obstruent devoicing is common in Dutch and was already widespread in Old Dutch, rendering vent as a variant of vend(e) possible.
  • Possibly a shortening of vennoot (partner (in a company)), which is equivalent to a compound of veem ((storage) company) +‎ genoot (companion, partner), but there is no evidence of an overlap in sentences.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vent m (plural venten, diminutive ventje n)

  1. chap, fellow

VerbEdit

vent

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of venten
  2. imperative of venten

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French vent, from Latin ventus, from Proto-Italic *wentos, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂wéh₁n̥ts < *h₂weh₁- (to blow).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vent m (plural vents)

  1. Atmospheric wind.
  2. (euphemistic) A flatulence.
  3. (uncountable) Empty words, hot air.
    Toutes ces promesses, c'est du vent. — Those are empty promises.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French vent, from Latin ventus, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂weh₁- (to blow).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

vent m (plural vents)

  1. (Jersey, Guernsey) wind

Derived termsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vent

  1. neuter singular of ven

VerbEdit

vent

  1. imperative of vente

Norwegian NynorskEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vent

  1. neuter singular of ven

VerbEdit

vent

  1. imperative of venta
  2. imperative of vente

OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Provençal vent, from Latin ventus.

NounEdit

vent m (plural vents)

  1. wind (movement of air)

Related termsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ventus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vent m (oblique plural venz or ventz, nominative singular venz or ventz, nominative plural vent)

  1. wind (movement of air)
    • circa 1110, Benedeit, Le Voyage de saint Brandan:
      Un meis sanz vent nagerent tut plein
      They sailed for a whole month without wind

DescendantsEdit