sporadic

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin sporadicus (cf. French sporadique, Italian sporadico, Spanish esporadico), from Greek sporadikós < sporad-, sporás ("scattered", "dispersed") < sporá, spóros ("sowing").[1]

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sporadic ‎(comparative more sporadic, superlative most sporadic)

  1. (archaic) (of diseases) occurring in isolated instances; not epidemic.
  2. Rare and scattered in occurrence.
    • 2015 March 12, Daniel Taylor, “Chelsea out of Champions League after Thiago Silva sends 10-man PSG through on away goals”[1], The Guardian (London):
      It was a stodgy, weary display from Mourinho’s team with only sporadic moments when they threatened Salvatore Sirigu’s goal and their manager seemed bewildered afterwards when he tried to explain what had gone wrong.
  3. Exhibiting random behavior; patternless.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ The Compact Edition of the Oxford English Dictionary, p. 2978.
Read in another language