stickler

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From stickle +‎ -er.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

stickler (plural sticklers)

  1. (now only Cornish) A referee or adjudicator at a fight, wrestling match, duel, etc. who ensures fair play. [from 16th c.]
    • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.27:
      In ancient time they were wont to employ third persons as sticklers, to see no treachery or disorder were used, and to beare witnes of the combates successe.
    • Sir Philip Sidney
      Basilius, the judge, appointed sticklers and trumpets whom the others should obey.
    • Dryden
      Our former chiefs, like sticklers of the war, / First sought to inflame the parties, then to poise.
  2. Someone who insistently advocates for something. [from 17th c.]
    • Jonathan Swift
      The Tory or High-church were the greatest sticklers against the exorbitant proceedings of King James II.
    Lexicographers are sticklers for correct language.

TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit

Last modified on 18 April 2014, at 00:40