styptic

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin stypticus, from Ancient Greek στυπτικός (stuptikós), from στύφειν (stúphein, to contract).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

styptic (comparative more styptic, superlative most styptic)

  1. Bringing about contraction of tissues; harsh, raw, austere.
    • 1982, TC Boyle, Water Music, Penguin 2006, p. 328:
      Boyles turns to look over his shoulder, squinting into the styptic sun, and then flags a hand over his head.
  2. (medicine, by extension) That stops bleeding.
    • 1973, Nicholas Monsarrat, The Kapillan of Malta:
      The growth on top was a scrubby plant, unknown anywhere else on Malta, which was believed to have styptic qualities – it could staunch bleeding when packed on top of a wound […].
    • 1959, Daniel Keyes, Flowers for Algernon:
      But I waited while he dabbed at the cut with styptic powder.

NounEdit

styptic (plural styptics)

  1. A substance used for styptic results.
    • 1876, Henry Beasley, The Book of Prescriptions:
      The powdered gum with resin is used as a styptic; and the mucilage has been recommended as an application to burns.
    • 1889, John Barclay Biddle, Materia Medica and Therapeutics: For Physicians and Students:
      Externally, it is applied as a styptic, and in solution, of various strengths, as an astringent.
    • 1990, A. L. Tommie Bass et al., Herbal Medicine Past and Present
      Knowledge of puffball's use as a styptic and for hemorrhoids reached Bass through the popular tradition.

Derived termsEdit