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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English suant (following),[1] from Anglo-Norman suant, from Old French suiant, sivant, present participle of sivre (to follow), from Latin sequor

AdjectiveEdit

suant (comparative more suant, superlative most suant)

  1. (obsolete or dialectal, rare) Smooth, or proceeding smoothly.

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

AdverbEdit

suant (comparative more suant, superlative most suant)

  1. (obsolete or dialectal, rare) Smoothly; without difficulty.
    • 1899, Sabine Baring-Gould, Book of the West[1], page 252:
      Peter and his wife did not get on very "suant" together.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ suant” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2019.

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

VerbEdit

suant

  1. present participle of suar

DalmatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sānctus.

AdjectiveEdit

suant

  1. holy

NounEdit

suant m

  1. saint

FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

suant

  1. present participle of suer

AdjectiveEdit

suant (feminine singular suante, masculine plural suants, feminine plural suantes)

  1. sweaty or sweating

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

Old FrenchEdit