See also: Saint and SA Int

EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /seɪnt/
    • (file)
    • Rhymes: -eɪnt
  • (UK, as an unstressed, capitalised title) IPA(key): /sən(t)/, /sɨn(t)/

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English saint, seint, sainct, seinct, sanct, senct, partly from Old English sanct (saint) and confluence with Old French saint, seinte (Modern French saint); both from Latin sanctus (holy, consecrated”, in Late Latin as a noun, “a saint), past participle of sancire (to render sacred, make holy), akin to sacer (holy, sacred). Displaced native Middle English halwe (saint) from Old English hālga (saint, holy one) (> Modern English hallow (saint)).

NounEdit

 
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Francis of Assisi, a Catholic saint.

saint (plural saints)

  1. A person whom a church or another religious group has officially recognised as especially holy or godly; one eminent for piety and virtue.
    Kateri Tekakwitha was proclaimed a saint.
  2. (figuratively, by extension) A person with positive qualities; one who does good.
    Dorothy Day was a living saint.
    Thanks for looking after the house while I'm away. You're a saint!
  3. One of the blessed in heaven.
  4. (archaic) A holy object.
SynonymsEdit
  • (holy person): hallow (obsolete)
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English saynten, seinten, sonten, partly from Anglo-Norman saintir and partly from the noun Middle English seint, seynt (see above).

VerbEdit

saint (third-person singular simple present saints, present participle sainting, simple past and past participle sainted)

  1. (transitive) To canonize, to formally recognize someone as a saint.
    Many wish to see Pope John Paul II sainted immediately.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From the pattern of naming various places for Saints from religion.

PrefixEdit

saint

  1. (toponymy) A prefix attached to another term, used to create placenames. The resultant placename need not be associated with any religious saint character.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sanctus (holy)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

saint m (plural saints, feminine sainte)

  1. A male saint; masculine of sainte

AdjectiveEdit

saint (feminine singular sainte, masculine plural saints, feminine plural saintes)

  1. saintly (all meanings)

Derived termsEdit

- in Canadian toponyms:

- In Guadeloupean toponyms:

- In toponyms of Martinique:

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

saint f (genitive singular sainte)

  1. greed, avarice, covetousness
  2. great eagerness, desire

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
saint shaint
after an, tsaint
not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French saint, from Latin sanctus (holy).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

saint m

  1. (Jersey) holy

NounEdit

saint m (plural saints)

  1. (Jersey, religion) saint

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin sanctus

NounEdit

saint m (oblique plural sainz or saintz, nominative singular sainz or saintz, nominative plural saint)

  1. saint

DeclensionEdit

AdjectiveEdit

saint m (oblique and nominative feminine singular sainte)

  1. holy
  2. pious; devout

DescendantsEdit

  • English: saint
  • French: saint
  • Norman: saint (Jersey)

WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

saint m pl (not mutable)

  1. plural of sant