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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin. From suī (“of its own”) + generis, the genitive of genus (“kind”). Literally meaning “of its own kind”.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sui generis (not comparable)

  1. In a class of its own; one of a kind.
    Anyone who considers the Femmes sui generis has never listened to the Velvets.
    • 1994, Frances and Joseph Gies, “The Technology of the Commercial Revolution”, in Cathedral, Forge, and Waterwheel, ISBN 9780060925819, page 111:
      The system was neither free enterprise nor socialism; it was sui generis, one of the unique creations of the Middle Ages.
    • 1995, How To Do Things With Words, by J.L. Austin
      We see him as he sees himself, surveying the invisible depths of ethical space, with all the distinction of a specialist in the sui generis.
  1. (rarer) By itself; of its own.
    It is nothing to worry about sui generis, but in context of the other factors it's alarming indeed.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin.

AdjectiveEdit

sui generis (invariable)

  1. sui generis