See also: Sunny

EnglishEdit

 
sunny sky with clouds

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English sunni, from Old English *sunniġ. Cognate with West Frisian sinnich, Low German sünnig, Dutch zonnig, German sonnig. Equivalent to sun +‎ -y

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sunny (comparative sunnier, superlative sunniest)

  1. (of weather or a day) Featuring a lot of sunshine.
    Whilst it may be sunny today, the weather forecast is predicting rain.
  2. (of a place) Receiving a lot of sunshine.
    the sunny side of a hill
    I would describe Spain as sunny, but it's nothing in comparison to the Sahara.
  3. (figuratively) Cheerful.
    a person with a sunny disposition
    • c. 1590, William Shakespeare, The Comedy of Errors Act I scene 1
      My decayed fair / A sunny look of his would soon repair.
    • 1841, Charles Dickens, Barnaby Rudge
      A gleam of sun shining through the unsashed window, and chequering the dark workshop with a broad patch of light, fell full upon him, as though attracted by his sunny heart.
    • 1849, The Literary Garland (page 244)
      Unloved, and uncaressed, her childhood unbrightened by the sunny mirth of that age, her girlhood a gloomy period of austere seclusion []
  4. Of or relating to the sun; proceeding from, or resembling the sun; shiny; radiant.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

AdverbEdit

sunny (not comparable)

  1. (US, regional) sunny side up

NounEdit

sunny (plural sunnies)

  1. A sunfish.