swith

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English swith, from Old English swīþ ‎(strong, mighty, powerful, active, severe, violent), from Proto-Germanic *swinþaz ‎(strong), from Proto-Indo-European *swento- ‎(active, healthy). Cognate with Old Saxon swīth, Middle High German swind (Modern German geschwind ‎(fast, quick, swift)), Middle Low German swīde (Modern Low German swied ‎(very, quite)), Dutch gezwind ‎(fast, quick, swift), West Frisian swiid ‎(impressive, special), Old Norse svinnr, Gothic 𐍃𐍅𐌹𐌽𐌸𐍃 ‎(swinþs, strong). Related to sound.

AdjectiveEdit

swith ‎(comparative swither, superlative swithest)

  1. (dialectal or obsolete) Strong; vehement.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English swith, swithe, from Old English swīþe ‎(very much, exceedingly, severely, violently, fiercely), from Proto-Germanic *swinþa ‎(strongly), from Proto-Indo-European *swento- ‎(active, healthy). Not cognate to superficially similar swift, as these have distinct PIE roots, though both share *swe- prefix in PIE.

Alternative formsEdit

AdverbEdit

swith ‎(comparative swither, superlative swithest)

  1. (dialectal or obsolete) Quickly, speedily, promptly.
  2. (dialectal or obsolete) Strongly; vehemently; very.
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