Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin tautologia, from Ancient Greek ταυτολογία(tautología) from ταὐτός(tautós, the same) + λόγος(lógos, explanation)

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tɔˈtɒl.ə.d͡ʒi/

NounEdit

tautology ‎(countable and uncountable, plural tautologies)

  1. (uncountable) Redundant use of words.
    It is tautology to say, "Forward Planning".
  2. (countable) An expression that features tautology.
    The expression "raze to the ground" is a tautology, since the word "raze" includes the notion "to the ground".
    • 1946, Bertrand Russell, History of Western Philosophy:
      Pure mathematics consists of tautologies, analogous to ‘men are men’, but usually more complicated.
  3. (countable, logic) In propositional logic: a statement that is true for all truth values of its propositional variables. In first-order logic: a statement that is true for all truth values of its Boolean atoms.

AntonymsEdit

Coordinate termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit