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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin redundans, present participle of redundare (to overflow, redound), from red- (again, back) + undo (I surge, flood), from unda (a wave).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

redundant (comparative more redundant, superlative most redundant)

  1. Superfluous; exceeding what is necessary.
  2. (of words, writing, etc) Repetitive or needlessly wordy.
  3. (chiefly Britain, New Zealand, Australia) Dismissed from employment because no longer needed; as in "rendered redundant".
  4. Duplicating or able to duplicate the function of another component of a system, providing back-up in the event the other component fails.
    • 2013, Tom Denton, Automobile Electrical and Electronic Systems, page 142:
      The two lines are mainly used for redundant and therefore fault-tolerant message transmission, but they can also transmit different messages.

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin redundans.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

redundant (masculine and feminine plural redundants)

  1. redundant

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

redundant (comparative redundanter, superlative am redundantesten)

  1. redundant

DeclensionEdit

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Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

RomanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from English redundant and French redondant.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

redundant m, n (feminine singular redundantă, masculine plural redundanți, feminine and neuter plural redundante)

  1. redundant

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit