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See also: tesserà

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin tessera (a cube, a die with numbers on all six sides), from Ancient Greek τέσσαρες (téssares, four).

NounEdit

tessera (plural tesserae)

  1. A small square piece of stone, wood, ivory or glass used for making a mosaic.
  2. (planetology) complex-ridged surface feature seen on plateau highlands of Venus and perhaps on Triton

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin tessera (a cube, a die with numbers on all six sides), from Ancient Greek τέσσαρες (téssares, four).

NounEdit

tessera f (plural tessere)

  1. card; credit card
  2. pass
  3. tessera (small square piece used for making a mosaic)
  4. domino

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

tessera

  1. third-person singular present indicative of tesserare
  2. second-person singular imperative of tesserare

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek τέσσαρες (téssares, four).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tessera f (genitive tesserae); first declension

  1. tessera
  2. die (used in games)
  3. watchword
  4. token

InflectionEdit

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative tessera tesserae
genitive tesserae tesserārum
dative tesserae tesserīs
accusative tesseram tesserās
ablative tesserā tesserīs
vocative tessera tesserae

ReferencesEdit

  • tessera in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • tessera in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “tessera”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • tessera” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to give the watchword, countersign: tesseram dare (Liv. 28. 14)
  • tessera in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • tessera in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin