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See also: Ticket

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English ticket, from Old French etiquet m, *estiquet m, and etiquette f, estiquette f (a bill, note, label, ticket), from Old French estechier, estichier, estequier (to attach, stick), (compare Picard estiquier (to stick, pierce)), from Frankish *stikkan, *stikjan (to stick, pierce, sting), from Proto-Germanic *stikaną, *stikōną, *staikijaną (to be sharp, pierce, prick), from Proto-Indo-European *st(e)ig-, *(s)teyg- (to be sharp, to stab). Doublet of etiquette. More at stick.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ticket (plural tickets or tix) (tix is informal)

 
A ticket.
  1. A pass entitling the holder to admission to a show, concert, etc.
  2. A pass entitling the holder to board a train, a bus, a plane, or other means of transportation
  3. A citation for a traffic violation.
  4. A permit to operate a machine on a construction site.
  5. A service request, used to track complaints or requests that an issue be handled. (Generally technical support related).
  6. (informal) A list of candidates for an election, or a particular theme to a candidate's manifesto.
    Joe has joined the party's ticket for the county elections.
    Joe will be running on an anti-crime ticket.
  7. A solution to a problem; something that is needed.
    That's the ticket.
    I saw my first bike as my ticket to freedom.
    • 1884, Mark Twain, chapter 34, in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, →ISBN:
      "Here's the ticket. This hole's big enough for Jim to get through if we wrench off the board."
  8. (dated) A little note or notice.
    • Fuller
      He constantly read his lectures twice a week for above forty years, giving notice of the time to his auditors in a ticket on the school doors.
  9. (dated) A tradesman's bill or account (hence the phrase on ticket and eventually on tick).
    • J. Cotgrave
      Your courtier is mad to take up silks and velvets / On ticket for his mistress.
  10. A label affixed to goods to show their price or description.
  11. A certificate or token of a share in a lottery or other scheme for distributing money, goods, etc.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

ticket (third-person singular simple present tickets, present participle ticketing, simple past and past participle ticketed)

  1. To issue someone a ticket, as for travel or for a violation of a local or traffic law.
  2. To mark with a ticket.
    to ticket goods in a retail store

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

English

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ticket m (plural tickets)

  1. ticket (admission, pass)
  2. receipt
  3. (Quebec) ticket (traffic citation)

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

English

NounEdit

ticket m (invariable)

  1. prescription charge
  2. ticket stub (especially at a horserace)

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English ticket.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ticket m (plural tickets)

  1. ticket (slip entitling the holder to something)

SynonymsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

English

NounEdit

ticket m (plural tickets)

  1. receipt

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

ticket

  1. definite singular of tick