English edit

Pronunciation edit

Contraction edit

th’

  1. (poetic, archaic) Contraction of the.
  2. (archaic) Contraction of thou.
  3. (colloquial) Contraction of there.
    • 1891 Feb, Edith Brower, “Treshornish”, in The Overland Monthly, volume XVII, number 98, San Francisco: The Overland Monthly Publishing Company, →ISSN, →OCLC, page 135:
      She crossed her hand an’ turned her face up like a bird does, only th’ ain’t no birds what can sing like she did; seemed like she was n’t a‐doin’ of it at all,—voice came out of itself, like ’s if ’t was just a waitin’ for a change to git out.

Anagrams edit

Irish edit

Pronunciation edit

Determiner edit

th’

  1. Munster form of d’ (your sg)

Yola edit

Etymology 1 edit

Article edit

th'

  1. Alternative form of a (the)
    • 1867, OBSERVATIONS BY THE EDITOR, page 18:
      Nich th' hie thoras o' Culpake.
      [Nigh to the high thorns of Colepeak.]
    • 1867, GLOSSARY OF THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, page 75:
      Fhaade th' veezer.
      What the wiser.
    • 1867, GLOSSARY OF THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, page 80:
      Th' mucha zea sthroan.
      The great sea-strand.

Etymology 2 edit

Pronoun edit

th'

  1. Alternative form of thou (you)
    • 1867, GLOSSARY OF THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, page 77:
      Th' weithest.
      Thou seemest.

Etymology 3 edit

Determiner edit

th'

  1. Alternative form of thee (thy)
    • 1867, CONGRATULATORY ADDRESS IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, page 114, line 1:
      MAI'T BE PLESANT TO TH' ECCELLENCIE
      MAY IT PLEASE YOUR EXCELLENCY
    • 1867, CONGRATULATORY ADDRESS IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, page 114, line 5:
      Th' Eccellencie.
      Your Excellency.

Etymology 4 edit

Pronoun edit

th'

  1. Alternative form of at (that)
    • 1867, CONGRATULATORY ADDRESS IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, page 114, lines 9-11:
      Yn ercha an aul o' while yt beeth wi gleezom o' core th' oure eyen dwytheth apan ye Vigere o'dicke Zouvereine, Wilyame ee Vourthe,
      In each and every condition it is with joy of heart that our eyes rest upon the representative of that Sovereign, William IV.,

References edit

  • Jacob Poole (d. 1827) (before 1828), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, published 1867