thrutch

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English thrucchen (to push, rush), from Old English þryċċan (to push, press, trample on, crush), from Proto-Germanic *þrukkijaną (to press).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

thrutch (third-person singular simple present thrutches, present participle thrutching, simple past and past participle thrutched)

  1. (rare or dialectal) To push; press.
  2. To crowd; throng; squeeze.
  3. (figurative) To trouble; oppress.
  4. To thrust.
  5. (caving, climbing (sport)) To push, press, or squeeze into a place; move sideways or vertically in an upright position by wriggling the body against opposing rock surfaces. Compare chimney.
    I thrutched up the final crack to a small pinnacle.
SynonymsEdit

NounEdit

thrutch (plural thrutches)

  1. (caving, climbing (sport)) An obstacle overcome by thrutching; an act of thrutching (See verb #5)
  2. (Britain dialectal, Northern England) A narrow gorge or ravine.

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Oxford Dictionaries. April 2010. Oxford Dictionaries. April 2010. Oxford University Press, thrutch. 11 September 2011. Article.