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See also: raviné

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French ravin (a gully), from Old French raviner (to pillage, sweep down, cascade), from ravine (robbery, rapine; violent rush of water, waterfall, avalanche; impetuosity, spirit), from Latin rapina (cf. rapine).

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: rə-vēnʹ, IPA(key): /ɹəˈviːn/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːn

NounEdit

ravine (plural ravines)

  1. A deep narrow valley or gorge in the earth's surface worn by running water.
    • 1913, Robert Barr, chapter 3, in Lord Stranleigh Abroad[1]:
      He fell into a reverie, a most dangerous state of mind for a chauffeur, since a fall into reverie on the part of a driver may mean a fall into a ravine on the part of the machine.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Old French verb raviner (flow with force; sweep down; pillage, cascade), or from the noun ravine, raveine (robbery, rapine; violent rush of water, waterfall, avalanche; impetuosity, spirit), from Latin rapīna, whence also the borrowed rapine.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ravine f (plural ravines)

  1. a small ravine or gully
  2. beginning of a furrowing or formation of a ravine

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

ravine

  1. first-person singular present indicative of raviner
  2. third-person singular present indicative of raviner
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of raviner
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of raviner
  5. second-person singular imperative of raviner