See also: Tiff and TIFF

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tɪf/
  • Rhymes: -ɪf
    • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

Originally, a sniff, sniffing; compare Icelandic word for a smell.

NounEdit

tiff (plural tiffs)

  1. A small argument; a petty quarrel.
    • 1840, William Makepeace Thackeray, Catherine: A Story:
      There’s Tom, now, since this tiff with Mrs. Cat, the scoundrel plays the Grand Turk here!
    • 1997, Haruki Murakami, Jay Rubin, transl., The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, New York: Alfred A. Knopf, Inc.; republished New York: Vintage Books, 1998, →ISBN, page 30:
      Something to laugh off, not make a big issue out of. We’d had a little tiff and would have forgotten about it in a couple of days.
    • 2000 September 30, Guy Browning, “How to... have a tiff”, in The Guardian[1]:
      At the other extreme, couples who are married with children have heavily disguised tiffs. A man saying in a slightly strained way, 'I'm going to turn the compost', is actually saying, 'And that's all you are, Jean, compost!' Of course, what happens is eventually he apologises, they cry, make love, have another child, get overtired and the tiffing continues.
  2. Liquor; especially, a small draught of liquor.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

tiff (third-person singular simple present tiffs, present participle tiffing, simple past and past participle tiffed)

  1. (intransitive) To quarrel.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:squabble
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English tiffen, Old French tiffer, tifer ("to bedizen"; > Modern French attifer), from Frankish *tipfōn, *tippōn (to decorate), perhaps related to Proto-Germanic *tuppaz (top, tip). Compare Dutch tippen (to clip the points or ends of the hair), Old Norse tippa (point, tip), English tip (noun), Middle High German zipfen (to prance; skip; sashay; bob; flutter; frisk).

VerbEdit

tiff (third-person singular simple present tiffs, present participle tiffing, simple past and past participle tiffed)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To deck out; to dress.
    • 1768-1777, Abraham Tucker, The Light of Nature Pursued
      Is the Miss under a force when she culls among her trinkets with curious toil to tiff herself out in the most engaging manner

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

tiff (third-person singular simple present tiffs, present participle tiffing, simple past and past participle tiffed)

  1. (British India, intransitive) To have lunch.
    • 1841, The Asiatic journal and monthly register
      Besides that one to which the permanent residence was attached, Mr. Augustus had several outlaying factories, which he visited from time to time, to superintend the manufacture of his indigo; at all of these he had little bungalows, or temporary abodes, where we tiffed and passed the heat of the day.
Related termsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

NounEdit

tiff (plural tiffs)

  1. Alternative form of TIFF

ReferencesEdit

tiff in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913

AnagramsEdit