See also: Tiff and TIFF

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tɪf/
  • Rhymes: -ɪf
    • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

Originally, a sniff, sniffing; compare Icelandic word for a smell.

NounEdit

tiff (plural tiffs)

  1. A small argument; a petty quarrel.
    • 1840, William Makepeace Thackeray, Catherine: A Story:
      There’s Tom, now, since this tiff with Mrs. Cat, the scoundrel plays the Grand Turk here!
    • 1997, Haruki Murakami, Jay Rubin, transl., The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, New York: Alfred A. Knopf, Inc.; republished New York: Vintage Books, 1998, →ISBN, page 30:
      Something to laugh off, not make a big issue out of. We’d had a little tiff and would have forgotten about it in a couple of days.
  2. Liquor; especially, a small draught of liquor.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

tiff (third-person singular simple present tiffs, present participle tiffing, simple past and past participle tiffed)

  1. (intransitive) To quarrel.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English tiffen, Old French tiffer, tifer ("to bedizen"; > Modern French attifer), from Frankish *tipfōn, *tippōn (to decorate), perhaps related to Proto-Germanic *tuppaz (top, tip). Compare Dutch tippen (to clip the points or ends of the hair), Old Norse tippa (point, tip), English tip (noun), Middle High German zipfen (to prance; skip; sashay; bob; flutter; frisk).

VerbEdit

tiff (third-person singular simple present tiffs, present participle tiffing, simple past and past participle tiffed)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To deck out; to dress.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of A. Tucker to this entry?)

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

tiff (third-person singular simple present tiffs, present participle tiffing, simple past and past participle tiffed)

  1. (British India, intransitive) To have lunch.
    • 1841, The Asiatic journal and monthly register
      Besides that one to which the permanent residence was attached, Mr. Augustus had several outlaying factories, which he visited from time to time, to superintend the manufacture of his indigo; at all of these he had little bungalows, or temporary abodes, where we tiffed and passed the heat of the day.
Related termsEdit

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for tiff in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit