travailler

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French travailler, from Old French traveillier (to suffer), from Vulgar Latin *tripaliāre, present active infinitive of *tripaliō (to torture; to toil, labor), from tripalium (torture instrument), from Latin tripālis (having three stakes). Compare Franco-Provençal travalyer, Catalan treballar, Portuguese trabalhar, Spanish trabajar, and English travail. Also compare English travel.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tʁa.va.je/
  • (file)

VerbEdit

travailler

  1. to work
  2. to study
  3. to struggle
    "Elle, qui n'était pas grosse comme un œuf / envieuse s'étend, et s'enfle, et se travaille / pour égaler l'animal en grosseur" - Jean De La Fontaine
    It, no larger than an egg, envious, elongated, stretched, and struggled / to equal the animal in size

DescendantsEdit

  • Danish: travaillere
  • Haitian Creole: travay
  • Italian: travagliare

ConjugationEdit

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French traveiller.

VerbEdit

travailler

  1. to suffer (be in a state of suffering)

ConjugationEdit

  • Middle French conjugation varies from one text to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

DescendantsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

travailler

  1. Alternative form of traveillier

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-aill, *-aills, *-aillt are modified to ail, auz, aut. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.