See also: bòsser

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

boss +‎ -er?

NounEdit

bosser (plural bossers)

  1. (Britain, dialect) A large marble.
    • 1953, Arthur Beckett, The Sussex County Magazine (volume 27, page 60)
      [] the ultimate winner is the man with the greatest number of marbles when play comes to an end. The games at Battle at the present time are played with glass marbles and locally made “bossers” of concrete.
    • 1997, Iona Archibald Opie, ‎Peter Opie, Children's games with things (page 54)
      Modern children, having only machine-made glass marbles, are restricted to names describing their size, or the names under which they are sold, or fanciful names of their own inventing. Thus big marbles are big 'uns, bossers, bulls or bullies []

AnagramsEdit


BavarianEdit

NounEdit

bosser ?

  1. (Sauris) water

ReferencesEdit

  • Umberto Patuzzi, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar, Luserna: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien.

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

bosse +‎ -er; cf. bossoir

VerbEdit

bosser

  1. (nautical) to raise an anchor over the davit(s)

Etymology 2Edit

boss +‎ -er

VerbEdit

bosser

  1. (France, slang) to work (to do a task)

ConjugationEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit