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See also: Tuath and túath

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old Irish túath.

NounEdit

tuath (plural tuaths or tuatha)

  1. (historical) A tribe or group of people in Ireland, having a loose voluntary system of governance entered into through contracts by all members.
    • 2009, Diarmaid MacCulloch, A History of Christianity, Penguin 2010, p. 331:
      There was nothing fixed or enduring about many tuatha, and reflecting the itinerant character of much of Irish society, the Church developed the peculiar phenomenon of roving ecclesiastic families [...].

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish túath, from Proto-Celtic *toutā, from Proto-Indo-European *tewtéh₂.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tuath f (genitive singular tuaithe, nominative plural tuatha)

  1. (historical) people, tribe
    1. country, territory
    2. petty kingdom; territorial unit (of ancient Ireland)
  2. laity
  3. rural districts, country (rural area), countryside
    Tá mo mháthair faoin tuath.
    My mother is in the country(side).

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
tuath thuath dtuath
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


Scottish GaelicEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Irish túath, from Proto-Celtic *toutā, from Proto-Indo-European *tewtéh₂.

NounEdit

tuath f (genitive singular tuatha, plural tuathan)

  1. country people, folk
  2. countryside
  3. laity
  4. peasantry
  5. tenantry
Related termsEdit
  • tuathanach (farmer, agriculturalist, peasant; tenant; yeoman)

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Irish túaid, túaith.

NounEdit

tuath f

  1. north
    Antonym: deas
Derived termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

tuath

  1. northern, north

MutationEdit

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
tuath thuath
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit