See also: EAR, -ear, 'ear, èar, and éar

English edit

 
A human ear.

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English ere, eare, from Old English ēare (ear), from Proto-West Germanic *auʀā, from the voiced Verner alternant of Proto-Germanic *ausô (ear) (compare Scots ear, West Frisian ear, Dutch oor, German Ohr, Swedish öra, Danish øre), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ṓws (compare Old Irish áu, Latin auris, Lithuanian ausìs, Russian у́хо (úxo), Albanian vesh, Ancient Greek οὖς (oûs), Old Armenian ունկն (unkn), and Persianگوش(gôš)).

Noun edit

ear (plural ears)

  1. (countable) The organ of hearing, consisting of the pinna, auditory canal, eardrum, malleus, incus, stapes and cochlea.
  2. (countable) The external part of the organ of hearing, the auricle.
    • 1897 December (indicated as 1898), Winston Churchill, chapter IV, in The Celebrity: An Episode, New York, N.Y.: The Macmillan Company; London: Macmillan & Co., Ltd., →OCLC:
      Judge Short had gone to town, and Farrar was off for a three days' cruise up the lake. I was bitterly regretting I had not gone with him when the distant notes of a coach horn reached my ear, and I descried a four-in-hand winding its way up the inn road from the direction of Mohair.
  3. (countable, slang) A police informant.
    • 1976, Stirling Silliphant, Dean Riesner, Gail Morgan Hickman, The Enforcer:
      No I'm not kidding, and if you don't give it to me I'll let it out that you’re an ear.
  4. The sense of hearing; the perception of sounds; skill or good taste in listening to music.
    a good ear for music
  5. The privilege of being kindly heard; favour; attention.
    • 1625, Francis [Bacon], Apophthegmes New and Old. [], London: [] Hanna Barret, and Richard Whittaker, [], →OCLC:
      Dionysius [] would give no ear to his suit.
    • 1599 (first performance), William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Iulius Cæsar”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, →OCLC, [Act III, scene ii]:
      Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears.
    • 1990 August 19, Uwe Stelbrink, quotee, “Fear and uncertainty breed xenophobia in E. Germany”, in Democrat and Chronicle, volume 158, Rochester, N.Y., page 5A:
      They don’t know if they’re going to have a job in a week or a month. They don’t know if they can pay the rising prices. Instead of the paradise they expected July 1, their total existence is unsure. That some foreigners get beaten—nobody has an ear for that now.
  6. That which resembles in shape or position the ear of an animal; a prominence or projection on an object, usually for support or attachment; a lug; a handle; a foot-rest or step of a spade or a similar digging tool.
    the ears of a tub, skillet, or dish;   The ears of a boat are outside kneepieces near the bow.
    • 1886, Peter Christen Asbjørnsen, translated by H.L. Brækstad, Folk and Fairy Tales, page 291:
      When they got as far as the little valley north of Oppenhagen - where the land-slip took place - he thought he sat between the ears of a bucket; but shortly this vanished also, and it was only then he really came to himself again.
  7. (architecture) An acroterium.
  8. (architecture) A crossette.
  9. (journalism) A space to the left or right of a publication's front-page title, used for advertising, weather, etc.
    • 2006, Richard Weiner, Charles M. Levine, The Skinny about Best Boys, Dollies, Green Rooms, Leads, and Other Media Lingo, page 26:
      In journalism, ears flank the title as boxes in the left and right top corners of a publication (generally a newspaper).
Alternative forms edit
Meronyms edit
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
  • Tok Pisin: ia
Translations edit

Verb edit

ear (third-person singular simple present ears, present participle earing, simple past and past participle eared)

  1. (humorous) To take in with the ears; to hear.
  2. To hold by the ears.
    • 1964, John Hendrix, If I Can Do It Horseback: A Cow-Country Sketchbook, page 40:
      Sometimes, the helper eared the horse down; and sometimes he used a blindfold.
    • 2013, Fay E. Ward, The Cowboy at Work:
      The general technique was to rope the horse around the neck, and, while one or two men eared the horse down (held him by the ears), the rider saddled the animal and stepped above him.

See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

 
Ears of wheat.

From Middle English eere, er, from Old English ēar (Northumbrian dialect æhher), from Proto-West Germanic *ahaʀ, from Proto-Germanic *ahaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱ- (sharp).

See also West Frisian ier, Dutch aar, German Ähre; also Latin acus (needle; husk), Tocharian B āk (ear, awn), Old Church Slavonic ость (ostĭ, wheat spike, sharp point). More at edge.

The sense for an ear of a loaf of bread comes via the French épi.[1]

Noun edit

ear (plural ears)

  1. (countable) The fruiting body of a grain plant.
    He is in the fields, harvesting ears of corn.
  2. Outcroppings and ridges from a baguette surface, where the uncooked dough has been scored.
Synonyms edit
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Verb edit

ear (third-person singular simple present ears, present participle earing, simple past and past participle eared)

  1. (intransitive) To put forth ears in growing; to form ears, as grain does.
    This corn ears well.
Translations edit

Etymology 3 edit

From Middle English eren, from Old English erian, from Proto-West Germanic *arjan, from Proto-Germanic *arjaną, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂erh₃- (to plough).

Verb edit

ear (third-person singular simple present ears, present participle earing, simple past and past participle eared)

  1. (archaic) To plough.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

References edit

  1. ^ Bertinet, Richard (2019-02-07) Crumb: Show the Dough Who's Boss, Octopus, →ISBN: “Epi means an 'ear of wheat' and the idea is that everyone can pull off their own 'ear' from the loaf. The epi is made in the same way as the baguette but, instead of slashing the top, the ears are formed with scissor cuts.”

Anagrams edit

Irish edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ear

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter r.

See also edit

Latin edit

Verb edit

ear

  1. first-person singular present passive subjunctive of

Middle English edit

Noun edit

ear

  1. Alternative form of eere (ear of grain)

Old English edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-West Germanic *aur, from Proto-Germanic *auraz. Akin to Old Norse aurr (mud).

Noun edit

ēar m

  1. sea
  2. earth
Declension edit
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Proto-West Germanic *ahaʀ, from Proto-Germanic *ahaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱ- (pointed).

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

ēar n

  1. ear (of corn)
Declension edit
Descendants edit

Scots edit

Adverb edit

ear (not comparable)

  1. Alternative form of air (early)

References edit

Scottish Gaelic edit

Etymology edit

From Old Irish an air (literally from before), equivalent to modern a (from) + air (before).

Noun edit

ear f

  1. east
    Antonym: iar

Derived terms edit

See also edit

(compass points)

iar-thuath tuath ear-thuath
iar   ear
iar-dheas deas ear-dheas


References edit

  • Edward Dwelly (1911), “ear”, in Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan [The Illustrated Gaelic–English Dictionary], 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, →ISBN
  • ear” in Am Faclair Beag - Scottish Gaelic Dictionary.
  • ear” in LearnGaelic - Dictionary.

West Frisian edit

Etymology edit

From Old Frisian āre, from Proto-West Germanic *auʀā, from the voiced Verner alternant of Proto-Germanic *ausô, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ṓws.

Noun edit

ear n (plural earen, diminutive earke)

  1. ear

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

  • ear (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Yola edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English er, from Old English ǣr, from Proto-West Germanic *airi.

Preposition edit

ear

  1. ere, before
    • 1867, GLOSSARY OF THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, page 80:
      Ear yersthei.
      Ere yesterday.

References edit

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 37