EnglishEdit

 
a valise previously carried by US President Gerald Ford

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French valise.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /vəˈliːz/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːz

NounEdit

valise (plural valises)

  1. A piece of hand luggage such as a suitcase or travelling bag.
    • 1842, [anonymous collaborator of Letitia Elizabeth Landon], chapter LII, in Lady Anne Granard; or, Keeping up Appearances. [], volume III, London: Henry Colburn, [], OCLC 1000392275, page 40:
      Finding upon the corpse more money than was required for the funeral, he transmitted it to the abbess, together with a small valise, containing, besides apparel, some trifling articles of jewellery, and the bracelet transmitted to you,...

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Middle French valise, from Medieval Latin valesia, valixia, from Late Latin valisia, possibly from Gaulish *valisia (leather bag), from Proto-Celtic *val- (to enclose, surround), from Proto-Indo-European *welH-[1]. Or, possibly from Arabic وَلِيهَة(walīha, large bag).[2]

Maybe a borrowing through Italian valigia, even though this is dubious. Compare Spanish valija. [3]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

valise f (plural valises)

  1. case, suitcase

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

  1. ^ valise”, in The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th edition, Boston, Mass.: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2016, →ISBN.
  2. ^ Roberts, Edward A. (2014) A Comprehensive Etymological Dictionary of the Spanish Language with Families of Words based on Indo-European Roots, Xlibris Corporation, →ISBN
  3. ^ http://nq.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/issue_pdf/frontmatter_pdf/s9-X/247.pdf

AnagramsEdit


PortugueseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French valise.

PronunciationEdit

 

NounEdit

valise f (plural valises)

  1. a small suitcase
    Synonym: maleta