verst

EnglishEdit

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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Russian верста (verstá), partly through German Werst and French verste.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

verst (plural versts)

  1. A Russian unit of length, equivalent to about 1.07 kilometres or about 2/3 of a mile.
    • 1849, "The Observatory at Pulkowa" The North American Review Volume 0069 Issue 144 (July 1849):
      The hill Pulkowa, twelve miles (seventeen wersts) south of Admiralty Palace in St. Petersburg, ...
    • 1910, ‘Saki’, "Reginald in Russia", Reginald in Russia:
      Her particular part of the country was a few hundred versts the other side of Tamboff, with some fifteen miles of agrarian disturbance between her and the nearest neighbour.
    • 1918, Aylmer and Louise Maude, trans. Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina, Oxford 1998, p. 604:
      ‘Is it much further, Michael?’ she asked the clerk, to dispel the thoughts that frightened her. ‘They say it's seven versts from this village.’
    • 1988, Anthony Burgess, Any Old Iron:
      You have to tramp three or four versts to get to the exhibition of war loot, past Fabergé eggs and the Impressionists.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

verst

  1. Superlative form of ver

AdjectiveEdit

verst

  1. Superlative form of vers

FaroeseEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

verst

  1. worst, superlative form of illa

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

verst

  1. first

AdjectiveEdit

verst

  1. first

AdverbEdit

verst

  1. first
Last modified on 30 March 2014, at 18:40