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See also: Victoria, victória, and victòria

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

Named after Queen Victoria.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

victoria (plural victorias)

  1. A kind of low four-wheeled pleasure carriage, with a calash top, designed for two persons and the driver who occupies a high seat in front.
    • 1907, Robert William Chambers, chapter I, in The Younger Set (Project Gutenberg; EBook #14852), New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, published 1 February 2005 (Project Gutenberg version), OCLC 24962326:
      It was flood-tide along Fifth Avenue; motor, brougham, and victoria swept by on the glittering current; pretty women glanced out from limousine and tonneau; young men of his own type, silk-hatted, frock-coated, the crooks of their walking sticks tucked up under their left arms, passed on the Park side.

QuotationsEdit


AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin victōria.

NounEdit

victoria f (plural victories)

  1. victory

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin victōria.

NounEdit

victoria f (plural victorias)

  1. victory

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From victor (conqueror).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

victōria f (genitive victōriae); first declension

  1. victory

InflectionEdit

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative victōria victōriae
genitive victōriae victōriārum
dative victōriae victōriīs
accusative victōriam victōriās
ablative victōriā victōriīs
vocative victōria victōriae

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • victoria in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • victoria in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • victoria” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • our generation has seen many victories: nostra aetas multas victorias vidit
    • to gain a victory, win a battle: victoriam adipisci, parere
    • to gain a victory, win a battle: victoriam ferre, referre
    • to gain a victory over the enemy: victoriam reportare ab hoste
    • to consider oneself already victor: victoriam praecipere (animo) (Liv. 10. 26)
    • to let a sure victory slip through one's hands: victoriam exploratam dimittere
    • as if the victory were already won: sicut parta iam atque explorata victoria
    • to raise a shout of victory: victoriam conclamare (B. G. 5. 37)
    • to congratulate a person on his victory: victoriam or de victoria gratulari alicui
    • the victory cost much blood and many wounds, was very dearly bought: victoria multo sanguine ac vulneribus stetit (Liv. 23. 30)
    • to triumph over some one: triumphum agere de or ex aliquo or c. Gen. (victoriae, pugnae)
  • victoria in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • victoria in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray
  • victoria in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly

PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

victoria f (plural victorias)

  1. Obsolete form of vitória.

SpanishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin victōria.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bikˈto.ɾia/, [bikˈto̞ɾjä]

NounEdit

victoria f (plural victorias)

  1. victory

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit