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See also: Voluptas

Contents

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From volup (pleasurably).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

voluptās f (genitive voluptātis); third declension

  1. pleasure

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative voluptās voluptātēs
genitive voluptātis voluptātum
dative voluptātī voluptātibus
accusative voluptātem voluptātēs
ablative voluptāte voluptātibus
vocative voluptās voluptātēs

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • voluptas in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • voluptas in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • voluptas” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to derive pleasure from a thing: voluptatem ex aliqua re capere or percipere
    • to revel in pleasure, be blissfully happy: voluptate perfundi
    • to take one's fill of enjoyment: voluptatibus frui
    • to take one's fill of enjoyment: voluptates haurire
    • to devote oneself absolutely to the pursuit of pleasure: se totum voluptatibus dedere, tradere
    • to be led astray, corrupted by the allurements of pleasure: voluptatis illecebris deleniri
    • to be led astray, corrupted by the allurements of pleasure: voluptatis blanditiis corrumpi
    • to plunge into a life of pleasure: in voluptates se mergere
    • to hold aloof from all amusement: animum a voluptate sevocare
    • sensual pleasure: voluptates (corporis)
    • for one's own diversion; to satisfy a whim: voluptatis or animi causa (B. G. 5. 12)