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See also: Wald

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English walden, from Old English wealdan (to rule, control, determine, direct, command, govern, possess, wield, exercise, cause, bring about), from Proto-Germanic *waldaną (to rix, reign), from Proto-Indo-European *waldʰ- (to be strong, be powerful, prevail, possess). Cognate with German walten (to prevail, reign, dominate), Danish volde (to cause), Icelandic valda (to cause), Lithuanian valda (land property), Lithuanian valdyti (to rule).

VerbEdit

wald (third-person singular simple present walds, present participle walding, simple past and past participle walded)

  1. (Britain dialectal, transitive, intransitive) To govern; inherit.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English wald, iwald, from Old English ġeweald (might, power, possession, control, command, dominion, bridle, protection, subjection, groin, pudenda), from Proto-Germanic *waldą (might, power, main), from Proto-Indo-European *waldʰ- (to be strong, be powerful, prevail, possess). Cognate with German Gewalt (force, power, control, violence), Swedish våld (force, violence).

NounEdit

wald (plural walds)

  1. (Britain dialectal) Power; strength.
  2. (Britain dialectal) Command; control; possession.
Related termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English wald, from Old English weald (high land covered with wood, woods, forest), from Proto-Germanic *walþuz, whence also Old High German wald (German Wald) and Old Norse vǫllr (Faroese vøllur, Norwegian voll, Icelandic völlur).

NounEdit

wald (plural walds)

  1. Forest; woods.
    • 1812, Walter Scott, Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, Digitized edition, page 124:
      … we still recognize the ancient traditions of the Goths, concerning the wald-elven,…
    • 1853, Robert Simpson, History of Sanquhar[1], page 16:
      the romantic pass of the "wald path," along which runs a spur of an old Roman road
    • 1857, George Bradshaw, Bradshaw's illustrated hand-book to Switzerland and the Tyrol[2], Digitized edition, published 2006, page 1:
      MARDEN and STAPLEHURST—All this part of the line, through the Weald of Kent, i.e., the wald or forest, which still prevails here.

ReferencesEdit

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for wald in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English weald (high land covered with wood, woods, forest), from Proto-Germanic *walþuz, whence also Old High German wald (German Wald) and Old Norse vǫllr (Faroese vøllur, Norwegian voll, Icelandic völlur).

NounEdit

wald (plural walds or walden)

  1. a wooded area, forested land, the woods; a wooded tract, forest preserve; the forest as a wild place
    Þe wurmes & te wilde deor ... o þis wald wunieð. — St. Margaret of Antioch, c1225
    Ȝif æi mon hine mihte ifinden uppe þissere wælden, ... — Layamon's Brut, c1275
    Beliagog in þat nede Fond him riche wald To fine. — Sir Tristrem, c1330
    Was nouthire waldis in þar walke ne watir to fynde. — Wars of Alexander, 1450

ReferencesEdit

  • Middle English Dictionary

Old DanishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse vald.

NounEdit

wald

  1. force, violence

DescendantsEdit


Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *walþuz, whence also Old English weald, Old Norse vǫllr

NounEdit

wald m

  1. forest

DescendantsEdit


Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *walþuz, whence also Old English weald, Old Norse vǫllr.

NounEdit

wald m

  1. a forest

DescendantsEdit