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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English walten, from Old English wæltan, weltan, wieltan, wyltan, wiltan, from Proto-Germanic *waltijaną (to roll; roll about), from Proto-Indo-European *wel- (to turn; wind; twist). Cognate with German wälzen (to wallow; roll), Danish vælte (to tumble; overthrow), Swedish välta (to roll; tumble over; overthrow). Related to waltz.

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

walt (third-person singular simple present walts, present participle walting, simple past and past participle walted)

  1. (intransitive, dialectal or obsolete) To roll; tumble
  2. (transitive, dialectal or obsolete) To turn; cast; hurl; fling; overturn
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English *walt, from Old English *wealt (attested in unwealt (not given to roll; steady), sinwealt (circular, eternally rolling)), from Proto-Germanic *waltaz (changing; unstable), from Proto-Indo-European *wel- (to turn; wind; twist).

AdjectiveEdit

walt (comparative more walt, superlative most walt)

  1. (archaic, nautical) unsteady; crank
Derived termsEdit

Old DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *walþuz.

NounEdit

walt n

  1. forest, wood

InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle Dutch: wout
    • Dutch: woud
    • Limburgish: waadj

Further readingEdit

  • walt”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *waldą, whence also Old English weald, Old Norse vald

NounEdit

walt m

  1. authority

NounEdit

walt f

  1. authority

DescendantsEdit