Last modified on 15 September 2014, at 22:59

awkward

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From awk (odd, clumsy) +‎ -ward.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

awkward (comparative more awkward, superlative most awkward)

  1. (obsolete) In a backwards direction.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte d'Arthur, Bk.V, Ch.x:
      Than groned the knyght for his grymme woundis, and gyrdis to Sir Gawayne and awkewarde hym strykes, and [] kut thorow a vayne [].

AdjectiveEdit

awkward (comparative awkwarder or more awkward, superlative awkwardest or most awkward)

  1. Lacking dexterity in the use of the hands, or of instruments
    John was awkward at performing the trick. He'll have to practice to improve.
  2. Not easily managed or effected; embarrassing
    That was an extremely awkward moment. Everyone was watching.
  3. Lacking social skills, or uncomfortable with social interaction
    I'm very awkward at parties.
    Things get very awkward whenever 60-year old men use cheesy pick-up lines on me.
  4. Perverse; adverse; difficult to handle
    He's a right awkward chap.
    These cabinets are going to be very awkward when we move.

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