Last modified on 21 December 2014, at 04:34

bronze

See also: Bronze

EnglishEdit

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Wikipedia

A bronze medallion

EtymologyEdit

1730-40; from French bronze (1511), from Italian bronzo (13th cent.); see it for more.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bronze (countable and uncountable, plural bronzes)

  1. (uncountable) A natural or man-made alloy of copper, usually of tin, but also with one or more other metals.
  2. (countable and uncountable) A reddish-brown colour, the colour of bronze.
    bronze colour:    
  3. (countable) A work of art made of bronze, especially a sculpture.
  4. A bronze medal.
  5. Boldness; impudence; brass.
    • Alexander Pope
      Embrown'd with native bronze, lo! Henley stands.

TranslationsEdit

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AdjectiveEdit

bronze (comparative more bronze, superlative most bronze)

  1. Made of bronze metal.
    • 1907, Robert W. Chambers, The Younger Set, Ch.I:
      The house was a big elaborate limestone affair, evidently new. Winter sunshine sparkled on lace-hung casement, on glass marquise, and the burnished bronze foliations of grille and door.
  2. Having a reddish-brown colour.
  3. (of the skin) Tanned; darkened as a result of exposure to the sun.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

bronze (third-person singular simple present bronzes, present participle bronzing, simple past and past participle bronzed)

  1. (transitive) To plate with bronze.
    My mother bronzed my first pair of baby shoes.
  2. (transitive) To color bronze.
  3. (intransitive, of the skin) To change to a bronze or tan colour due to exposure to the sun.
    • 2006, Melissa Lassor, "Out of Darkness", page 124 in Watching Time
      His skin began to bronze as he worked in our garden each day.
  4. (transitive) To make hard or unfeeling; to brazen.
    • Sir Walter Scott
      the lawyer who bronzes his bosom instead of his forehead

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bronze m (plural bronzes)

  1. bronze (metal)
  2. bronze medal

Derived termsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French bronze.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /brɔnɡsə/, [ˈb̥ʁʌŋsə]

NounEdit

bronze c (singular definite bronzen, plural indefinite bronzer)

  1. (uncountable) bronze (element; colour)
  2. (countable) bronze (work of art made of bronze), bronze medal

InflectionEdit

External linksEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Italian bronzo.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bronze m (plural bronzes)

  1. bronze (metal, work of art)

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit


GreenlandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

Danish bronze; see English bronze etymology

NounEdit

bronze

  1. bronze

PortugueseEdit

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia pt

EtymologyEdit

From French bronze, from Italian bronzo, either from Byzantine Greek βροντησίον (brontēsíon), presumably from Βρεντήσιον (Brentḗsion) ‘Brindisi’, known for the manufacture of bronze; or ultimately from Persian برنج (birinj, biranj, brass) ~ پرنگ (piring) ‘copper’.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bronze m (plural bronzes)

  1. bronze
  2. skin tan

Related termsEdit