Last modified on 21 August 2014, at 13:58

TranslingualEdit

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SymbolEdit

tan

  1. (trigonometry) A symbol of the trigonometric function tangent.

SynonymsEdit


EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From French tan (tanbark), from Gaulish tanno (live oak) (compare Breton tann (red oak), Old Cornish tannen), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰonu (fir) (compare Hittite [script?] (tanau, fir)[script?], Latin femur, genitive feminis (thigh), German Tann (woods), Tanne (fir), Albanian thanë (cranberry bush), Ancient Greek θάμνος (thámnos, thicket), Avestan [script?] (θanwarə), geitive [script?] (θanwanō, bow)[script?], Sanskrit धनुस् (dhánus), genitive [script?] (dhánvanus, bow)[script?]). Verb from Middle English tannen, from late Old English tannian (to tan a hide), from Anglo-Norman tanner, from tan.

NounEdit

tan (plural tans)

  1. A yellowish-brown colour.
    tan colour:    
  2. A darkening of the skin resulting from exposure to sunlight or similar light sources.
    She still has a tan from her vacation in Mexico.
  3. The bark of an oak or other tree from which tannic acid is obtained.
    • 1848, John Hannett, Bibliopegia, or, The Art of Bookbinding in all its branches, page 65:
      In two pints of water boil one ounce of tan, and a like portion of nutgall till reduced to a pint.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

AdjectiveEdit

tan (comparative tanner, superlative tannest)

  1. Of a yellowish-brown.
    Mine is the white car parked next to the tan pickup truck.
  2. Having dark skin as a result of exposure to the sun.
    You’re looking very tan this week.
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

tan (third-person singular simple present tans, present participle tanning, simple past and past participle tanned)

  1. (intransitive) To change to a tan colour due to exposure to the sun.
    No matter how long I stay out in the sun, I never tan. though I do burn.
  2. (transitive) To change an animal hide into leather by soaking it in tannic acid.[1] To work as a tanner.
  3. (transitive, informal) To spank or beat.
    • 1876, Mark Twain, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, ch. 3:
      "Well, go 'long and play; but mind you get back some time in a week, or I'll tan you."
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From a Brythonic language; influenced in form by yan (one) in the same series.

NumeralEdit

tan

  1. (dialect, rare) The second cardinal number two, formerly used in Celtic areas, especially Cumbria and parts of Yorkshire, for counting sheep, and stitches in knitting.[2]

Etymology 3Edit

From Armenian թան (tʿan).

NounEdit

tan

  1. ​An Armenian drink made of yoghurt and water similar to airan and doogh

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

NounEdit

tan

  1. picul (Asian unit of weight)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ See Wikipedia article on Tanning.
  2. ^ See Wikipedia article on Yan Tan Tethera

AnagramsEdit


BretonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *teɸnet- (fire) (compare Old Irish teine, Welsh tân).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tan m (plural tanioù)

  1. fire

CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

tan

  1. so, such
  2. (in comparisons, tan ... com) as ... as

Related termsEdit

  • tant (so much, so many)

CornishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *teɸnet- (fire) (compare Old Irish teine, Welsh tân).

NounEdit

tan m (plural tanow)

  1. fire

GalicianEdit

AdverbEdit

tan

  1. so, as (in comparisons)

Usage notesEdit

Usually paired with como, as tan [] como


Haitian CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French temps (time, weather)

NounEdit

tan

  1. time
  2. weather

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Back-formation from tanít, tanul, etc. Created during the Hungarian language reform which took place in the 18th-19th centuries.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tan (plural tanok)

  1. doctrine
  2. science of, theory, branch of instruction
  3. -logy, -graphy (in compound words)
  4. Something education-related (in compounds)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

tan

  1. rōmaji reading of たん

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

tan

  1. rafsi of tsani.

MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

tan

  1. Nonstandard spelling of tān.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of tán.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of tǎn.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of tàn.

Usage notesEdit

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From tanto

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

tan

  1. so, as
    Eres tan rico como te sientes. - "You are as rich as you feel."

Usage notesEdit

Usually paired with como: tan [] como - "as [] as"


TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Turkic taŋ (sky, daylight).

NounEdit

tan (definite accusative tanı, plural tanlar)

  1. dawn, twilight, sunrise, daylight
    O gece tan yeri ağırana kadar selâmettir. - "On that night, there is peace till twilight."

DeclensionEdit


WelshEdit

PrepositionEdit

tan

  1. until
  2. under
  3. while

Usage notesEdit

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
tan dan nhan than

ZayEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate to Silt'e [script?] (tan).

NounEdit

tan

  1. smoke (from a fire)

ReferencesEdit

  • Initial SLLE Survey of the Zway Area by Klaus Wedekind and Charlotte Wedekind