corridor

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from French corridor, from Italian corridore (= corridoio) long passage, from correre, to run.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkɒɹɪˌdɔː(ɹ)/, /ˈkɒrɪˌdə(ɹ)/
  • (GenAM) enPR: kôrʹədôr', IPA(key): /ˈkɔɹəˌdɔɹ/
  • (file)

NounEdit

corridor (plural corridors)

  1. A narrow hall or passage with rooms leading off it, for example in railway carriages (see Wikipedia).
    • 1931, Francis Beeding, chapter 1/1, Death Walks in Eastrepps[1]:
      Eldridge closed the despatch-case with a snap and, rising briskly, walked down the corridor to his solitary table in the dining-car.
  2. A restricted tract of land that allows passage between two places.
  3. Airspace restricted for the passage of aircraft.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Italian corridore.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

corridor m (plural corridors)

  1. passage, corridor
Last modified on 11 April 2014, at 12:31