cursus

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cursus.

NounEdit

cursus

  1. (rare) A course; a journey or progression.
    • 2002, Colin Jones, The Great Nation, Penguin 2003, p. 574:
      His cursus from Fréjus to Paris turned into a triumphal march, with whole towns and villages staging ceremonial entrées for him and cheering his passage.

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cursus m (plural cursussen, diminutive cursusje n)

  1. course

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cursus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cursus m (plural cursus)

  1. course (learning program)

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Perfect passive participle of currō (run).

PronunciationEdit

ParticipleEdit

cursus m (feminine cursa, neuter cursum); first/second declension

  1. (of a race, journey) run, having been run
  2. travelled through, traversed, ran, having been traversed

InflectionEdit

First/second declension.

Number Singular Plural
Case \ Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative cursus cursa cursum cursī cursae cursa
genitive cursī cursae cursī cursōrum cursārum cursōrum
dative cursō cursae cursō cursīs cursīs cursīs
accusative cursum cursam cursum cursōs cursās cursa
ablative cursō cursā cursō cursīs cursīs cursīs
vocative curse cursa cursum cursī cursae cursa

NounEdit

cursus m (genitive cursūs); fourth declension

  1. The act of running; race.
  2. Course, way, passage, journey; tendency.
  3. Journey, march, voyage, passage.
  4. (figuratively) Course, progress, direction, development, succession, passage; career.

InflectionEdit

Fourth declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative cursus cursūs
genitive cursūs cursuum
dative cursuī cursibus
accusative cursum cursūs
ablative cursū cursibus
vocative cursus cursūs

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Last modified on 14 April 2014, at 15:17