Last modified on 29 August 2014, at 03:27

curse

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from Late Old English curs (curse), of unknown origin.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

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curse (plural curses)

  1. A supernatural detriment or hindrance; a bane.
  2. A prayer or imprecation that harm may befall someone.
  3. The cause of great harm, evil, or misfortune; that which brings evil or severe affliction; torment.
    • Shakespeare
      The common curse of mankind, folly and ignorance.
  4. A vulgar epithet.
    • 2013 June 14, Sam Leith, “Where the profound meets the profane”, The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 1, page 37: 
      Swearing doesn't just mean what we now understand by "dirty words". It is entwined, in social and linguistic history, with the other sort of swearing: vows and oaths. Consider for a moment the origins of almost any word we have for bad language – "profanity", "curses", "oaths" and "swearing" itself.
  5. (slang) A woman's menses.

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

curse (third-person singular simple present curses, present participle cursing, simple past and past participle cursed or (archaic) curst)

  1. (transitive) To place a curse upon (a person or object).
    • 1910, Emerson Hough, chapter 1, The Purchase Price:
      Captain Edward Carlisle [] felt a curious sensation of helplessness seize upon him as he met her steady gaze, [] ; he could not tell what this prisoner might do. He cursed the fate which had assigned such a duty, cursed especially that fate which forced a gallant soldier to meet so superb a woman as this under handicap so hard.
  2. To call upon divine or supernatural power to send injury upon; to imprecate evil upon; to execrate.
    • Bible, Exodus xxii. 28
      Thou shalt not [] curse the ruler of thy people.
  3. (transitive) To speak or shout a vulgar curse or epithet.
  4. (intransitive) To use offensive or morally inappropriate language.
    • Bible, Matthew xxi. 74
      Then began he to curse and to swear.
    • William Shakespeare (1564-1616)
      His spirits hear me, / And yet I need must curse.
  5. To bring great evil upon; to be the cause of serious harm or unhappiness to; to furnish with that which will be a cause of deep trouble; to afflict or injure grievously; to harass or torment.
    • Alexander Pope (1688-1744)
      On impious realms and barbarous kings impose / Thy plagues, and curse 'em with such sons as those.

SynonymsEdit

  • (intransitive, use offensive language): swear

TranslationsEdit

AntonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

curse

  1. vocative masculine singular of cursus

RomanianEdit

NounEdit

curse f pl

  1. plural form of cursă

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

curse

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of cursar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of cursar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of cursar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of cursar.

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

curse

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of cursar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of cursar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of cursar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of cursar