Last modified on 11 September 2014, at 22:13
See also: fonds and Fonds

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English fond, fonned, past participle of Middle English fonnen (to be foolish, be simple, dote), equivalent to fon +‎ -ed. More at fon.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fond (comparative fonder, superlative fondest)

  1. (chiefly with of) Having a liking or affection (for).
    • Shakespeare
      more fond on her than she upon her love
    • Irving
      a great traveller, and fond of telling his adventures
  2. Affectionate.
    a fond farewell
    a fond mother or wife
  3. Indulgent.
    • 1905, Baroness Emmuska Orczy, chapter 1, The Tragedy in Dartmoor Terrace[1]:
      “The story of this adoption is, of course, the pivot round which all the circumstances of the mysterious tragedy revolved. Mrs. Yule had an only son, namely, William, to whom she was passionately attached ; but, like many a fond mother, she had the desire of mapping out that son's future entirely according to her own ideas. […]”
    I have fond grandparents who spoil me.
  4. Outlandish; foolish; silly.
    Your fond dreams of flying to Jupiter have been quashed by the facts of reality.
  5. (obsolete) Foolish; simple; weak.
    • Shakespeare
      Grant I may never prove so fond / To trust man on his oath or bond.
  6. (obsolete) Doted on; regarded with affection.
    • Byron
      Nor fix on fond abodes to circumscribe thy prayer.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

fond (plural fonds)

  1. The background design in lace-making.
  2. (cooking) brown residue in pans from cooking meats and vegetables.
    He used the fond to make a classic French pan sauce.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

fond (third-person singular simple present fonds, present participle fonding, simple past and past participle fonded)

  1. (obsolete) To have a foolish affection for, to be fond of.
  2. (obsolete) To caress; to fondle.
    • Dryden
      The Tyrian hugs and fonds thee on her breast.

TranslationsEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fond m

  1. fund

Derived termsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French fond, from Latin fundus, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰudʰ-no-, *bʰudʰ-mn̥- (bottom).

NounEdit

fond c (singular definite fonden, plural indefinite fonder)

  1. stock, broth

InflectionEdit

NounEdit

fond c, n (singular definite fonden or fondet, plural indefinite fonde or fonder)

  1. fund
  2. foundation, donation

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin fundus, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰudʰ-mn.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fond m (plural fonds)

  1. back
  2. bottom
  3. fund; funding
  4. foundation
  5. (figuratively) basics, essence
  6. background
  7. (cooking) base

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

fond

  1. third-person singular present indicative of fondre

External linksEdit


LadinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin fundus.

NounEdit

fond m (plural fonds)

  1. fund
  2. bottom

Serbo-CroatianEdit

NounEdit

fȍnd m (Cyrillic spelling фо̏нд)

  1. fund

DeclensionEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fond c

  1. fund
  2. backdrop; a theatrical scenery
  3. ("Kitchen French") broth

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

fund