Last modified on 30 April 2015, at 06:48

hag

See also: håg, hág, Hag, and Hag.

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Middle English hagge, hegge 'demon, old woman', shortening of Old English hægtesse, hægtes (harpy, witch), from Proto-Germanic *hagatusjǭ (compare Saterland Frisian Häkse (witch), Dutch heks, German Hexe (witch)), compounds of (1) *hagaz 'able, skilled' (compare Old Norse hagr (handy, skillful), Middle High German behac (pleasurable)), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱak- (compare Sanskrit शक्नोमि (śaknóti, he can)),[1] and (2) *tusjǭ 'witch' (compare dialectal Norwegian tysja (fairy, she-elf)).[2]

NounEdit

hag (plural hags)

  1. A witch, sorceress, or enchantress; a wizard.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Golding
      [Silenus] that old hag.
  2. (pejorative) An ugly old woman.
  3. A fury; a she-monster.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Crashaw to this entry?)
  4. A hagfish; an eel-like marine marsipobranch, Myxine glutinosa, allied to the lamprey, with a suctorial mouth, labial appendages, and a single pair of gill openings.
  5. A hagdon or shearwater.
  6. An appearance of light and fire on a horse's mane or a man's hair.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Blount to this entry?)
  7. The fruit of the hagberry, Prunus padus.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Scots hag (to cut), from Old Norse hǫgg ‘cut, gap, breach’, derivative of hǫggva ‘to hack, hew’; compare English hew.

NounEdit

hag (plural hags)

  1. A small wood, or part of a wood or copse, which is marked off or enclosed for felling, or which has been felled.
    • Fairfax
      This said, he led me over hoults and hags; / Through thorns and bushes scant my legs I drew.
  2. A quagmire; mossy ground where peat or turf has been cut.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dugdale to this entry?)

Etymology 3Edit

From Proto-Germanic *hag(g)ōnan (compare obsolete Dutch hagen ‘to torment, agonize’, Norwegian haga ‘to tire, weaken’).[3]

VerbEdit

hag (third-person singular simple present hags, present participle hagging, simple past and past participle hagged)

  1. (transitive) To harass; to weary with vexation.
    • L'Estrange
      How are superstitious men hagged out of their wits with the fancy of omens.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Vladimir Orel, A Handbook of Germanic Etymology, s.v. “*xaʒaz” (Leiden: Brill, 2003), 149-50.
  2. ^ E. C. Polomé, “Althochdeutsch hag(a)zussa ‘Hexe’: Versuch einer neuen Etymologie”, in: R. Bergmann, ed., Althochdeutsch 2 (Wörter und Namen. Forschungsgeschichte) (1987), 1107-12.
  3. ^ Guus Kroonen, Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic, s.v. “*hagla-” (Leiden: Brill, 2013), 199.

AnagramsEdit


BretonEdit

ConjunctionEdit

hag

  1. and

SynonymsEdit

  • ha - before consonants (or /j/)

CornishEdit

ConjunctionEdit

hag

  1. and (before a vowel)
    Yma hwans dhymm a diwes hag avel.
    I want a drink and an apple.

SynonymsEdit

  • ha - before a consonant.

DanishEdit

VerbEdit

hag

  1. imperative of hage