Last modified on 28 November 2014, at 00:48

notch

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

Recorded since 1577, probably a rebracketing of an + otch, which noun stems from Middle French oche (notch), itself from the Old French verb ochier (to notch), of unknown origin

NounEdit

notch (plural notches)

  1. A V-shaped cut.
  2. Such a cut, used for keeping a record
    The notches in that tribe's warrior axe handles stand for killed enemies.
  3. An indentation.
  4. A mountain pass; a defile
  5. (informal) A level or degree.
    This car is a notch better than the other.
    • 2014, Daniel Taylor, "World Cup 2014: Uruguay sink England as Suárez makes his mark," guardian.co.uk, 20 June:
      A better team might also have done more to expose Uruguay’s occasionally brittle defence, but England’s speed of thought and movement in their attacking positions was a good notch or two down from the Italy game.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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VerbEdit

notch (third-person singular simple present notches, present participle notching, simple past and past participle notched)

  1. (transitive) To cut a notch in (something).
  2. (transitive) To record (a score or similar) by making notches on something.
    The tribe's hunters notch their kills by notches on each's axe's handle.
  3. (transitive) To join by means of notches.
  4. (transitive) To achieve (something).
    The team notched a pair of shutout wins on Sunday.
    • 2010 October 21, “[www.portlandleader.net/articles/2010/10/21/sports/17734115.txt Panthers' football team]”, Portland Leader:
      Jenkins booted a pair of field goals, Hopkins and George Nwokoji each notched a touchdown.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit