Last modified on 12 August 2014, at 21:49
See also: PIT, pít, and pît

EnglishEdit

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Wikipedia

Close-up of a pit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English, from Old English pytt (pit, hole in the ground, well, grave, pustule, pockmark), from Proto-Germanic *putjaz (pit, well), from Latin puteus (trench, pit, well), from Proto-Indo-European *pewǝ- (to beat, hew). Cognate with West Frisian pet (pit), Eastern Frisian put (pit), Dutch put (well, pockmark), German Pfütze (puddle, pool), Danish pyt (pit), Icelandic pytt (pit).

NounEdit

pit (plural pits)

  1. A hole in the ground.
  2. (motor racing) An area at a motor racetrack used for refueling and repairing the vehicles during a race.
  3. (music) A section of the marching band containing mallet percussion instruments and other large percussion instruments too large to march, such as the tam tam. Also, the area on the sidelines where these instruments are placed.
  4. A mine.
  5. (archaeology) A hole or trench in the ground, excavated according to grid coordinates, so that the provenance of any feature observed and any specimen or artifact revealed may be established by precise measurement.
  6. (trading) A trading pit.
  7. (in the plural, with the, idiomatic, slang) Something particularly unpleasant.
    His circus job was the pits, but at least he was in show business.
  8. The bottom part of.
    I felt pain in the pit of my stomach.
  9. (colloquial) Armpit, oxter.
  10. (aviation) A luggage hold.
  11. (countable) A small surface hole or depression, a fossa.
    • 2013 July 20, “Welcome to the plastisphere”, The Economist, volume 408, number 8845: 
      [The researchers] noticed many of their pieces of [plastic marine] debris sported surface pits around two microns across. Such pits are about the size of a bacterial cell. Closer examination showed that some of these pits did, indeed, contain bacteria, […].
  12. The indented mark left by a pustule, as in smallpox.
  13. The grave, or underworld.
    • Milton
      Back to the infernal pit I drag thee chained.
    • Bible, Job xxxiii. 18
      He keepeth back his soul from the pit.
  14. An enclosed area into which gamecocks, dogs, and other animals are brought to fight, or where dogs are trained to kill rats.
    • John Locke
      as fiercely as two gamecocks in the pit
  15. Formerly, that part of a theatre, on the floor of the house, below the level of the stage and behind the orchestra; now, in England, commonly the part behind the stalls; in the United States, the parquet; also, the occupants of such a part of a theatre.
  16. Part of a casino which typically holds tables for blackjack, craps, roulette, and other games.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

pit (third-person singular simple present pits, present participle pitting, simple past and past participle pitted)

  1. (transitive) To make pits in.
    Exposure to acid rain pitted the metal.
  2. To put (a dog) into a pit for fighting.
  3. (transitive) To bring (something) into opposition with something else.
    Are you ready to pit your wits against one of the world's greatest puzzles?
    • 22 March 2012, Scott Tobias, AV Club The Hunger Games[1]
      For the 75 years since a district rebellion was put down, The Games have existed as an assertion of the Capital’s power, a winner-take-all contest that touts heroism and sacrifice—participants are called “tributes”— while pitting the districts against each other.
  4. (intransitive, motor racing) To return to the pits during a race for refuelling, tyre changes, repairs etc.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Dutch pit (kernel, core), from Middle Dutch pitte, from Proto-Germanic *pittan (compare Middle Franconian Pfitze (pimple)), oblique of *piþō. Compare pith.

NounEdit

pit (plural pits)

  1. A seed inside a fruit; a stone or pip inside a fruit.
  2. A shell in a drupe containing a seed.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

pit (third-person singular simple present pits, present participle pitting, simple past and past participle pitted)

  1. (transitive) To remove the stone from a stone fruit or the shell from a drupe.
    One must pit a peach to make it ready for a pie.
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CahuillaEdit

NounEdit

pít

  1. road, path, way

CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin pectus. Compare Italian petto, Portuguese peito, Romanian piept, Spanish pecho

NounEdit

pit m (plural pits)

  1. breast

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pit c (plural pitten, diminutive pitje n)

  1. A seed inside a fruit.
  2. burner (on a stove)
  3. spirit, vigour
    • 'Hij heeft pit' : He has something going for him.

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish pit, possibly related to putte (pit, hollow), Latin puteus.

NounEdit

pit f (genitive pite, nominative plural piteanna)

  1. vulva
  2. vagina

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
pit phit bpit
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

pit

  1. rafsi of plita.

ScotsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

tae pit (third-person singular simple present pits, present participle pittin, simple past pit, past participle pit)

  1. to put

SynonymsEdit


Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish pit, possibly related to putte (pit, hollow), Latin puteus.

NounEdit

pit f (genitive pite, plural pitean)

  1. female external genitalia, vulva
  2. (vulgar) cunt, pussy