Last modified on 7 July 2014, at 22:07

score

EnglishEdit

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PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Old English scora (notch) (and hence, a tally). (For twenty: The mark on a tally made by drovers for every twenty beasts passing through a tollgate.)

NounEdit

score (plural scores)

  1. The total number of points earned by a participant in a game.
    The player with the highest score is the winner.
  2. The number of points accrued by each of the participants in a game, expressed as a ratio or a series of numbers.
    The score is 8-1 although it's not even half-time!
  3. The performance of an individual or group on an examination or test, expressed by a number, letter, or other symbol; a grade.
    The test scores for this class were high.
  4. (cricket) A presentation of how many runs a side has scored, and how many wickets have been lost.
    England had a score of 107 for 5 at lunch.
  5. (cricket) The number of runs scored by a batsman, or by a side, in either an innings or a match.
  6. Twenty, 20 (number).
    • 1863 November 19, Abraham Lincoln, The Gettysburg Address, based on the signed "Bliss Copy"
      "Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal."
    Some words have scores of meanings.
  7. A distance of twenty yards, in ancient archery and gunnery.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
  8. A weight of twenty pounds.
  9. (music) One or more parts of a musical composition in a format indicating how the composition is to be played.
    • 2013 June 29, “Travels and travails”, The Economist, volume 407, number 8842, page 55: 
      Even without hovering drones, a lurking assassin, a thumping score and a denouement, the real-life story of Edward Snowden, a rogue spy on the run, could be straight out of the cinema. But, as with Hollywood, the subplots and exotic locations may distract from the real message: America’s discomfort and its foes’ glee.
  10. Subject.
    • 2005, Plato, Sophist. Translation by Lesley Brown. 245e.
      Well, although we haven't discussed the views of all those who make precise reckonings of being and not [being], we've done enough on that score.
  11. Account; reason; motive; sake; behalf.
    • Hudibras
      But left the trade, as many more / Have lately done on the same score.
    • Dryden
      You act your kindness in Cydria's score.
  12. A notch or incision; especially, one that is made as a tally mark; hence, a mark, or line, made for the purpose of account.
    • Shakespeare
      Whereas, before, our forefathers had no other books but the score and the tally, thou hast caused printing to be used.
  13. An account or reckoning; account of dues; bill; hence, indebtedness.
    • Shakespeare
      He parted well, and paid his score.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

score (third-person singular simple present scores, present participle scoring, simple past and past participle scored)

  1. (intransitive) To earn points in a game.
    Pelé scores again!
    • 2011 September 29, Jon Smith, “Tottenham 3 - 1 Shamrock Rovers”, BBC Sport:
      And White Hart Lane was stunned when Rovers scored just five minutes after the restart in front of their away following.
  2. (transitive) To earn (points) in a game.
    It is unusual for a team to score a hundred goals in one game.
  3. (intransitive) To achieve (a score) in e.g. a test.
    • 2004, Diane McGuinness, Early reading instruction: what science really tells up about how to teach readin
      At the end of first grade, the children scored 80 percent correct on this test, a value that remained unchanged through third grade.
  4. (intransitive) To record (the score) for a game or a match.
  5. (transitive) To scratch (paper or cardboard) with a sharp implement to make it easier to fold.
  6. (transitive) To make fine, shallow lines with a sharp implement, for example as cutting indications.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, “Foreword”, in The China Governess[1]:
      A very neat old woman, still in her good outdoor coat and best beehive hat, was sitting at a polished mahogany table on whose surface there were several scored scratches so deep that a triangular piece of the veneer had come cleanly away, […].
    The baker scored the cake so the servers would know where to slice it.
  7. (intransitive, slang) To have sexual intercourse.
    Chris finally scored with Pat last week.
  8. (transitive, slang) To acquire or gain.
    Did you score tickets for the concert?
  9. (intransitive) To obtain something desired.
  10. (transitive) To provide (a film, etc.) with a musical score.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English score.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /skoːrə/, [ˈsɡ̊oːɐ]

NounEdit

score c (singular definite scoren, plural indefinite scorer)

  1. A score, a number of points earned.

InflectionEdit

VerbEdit

score

  1. score
  2. land (to acquire; to secure)
  3. nick (Wikisaurus:steal)
  4. pull (persuade (someone) to have sex with one) [from 1959]

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Hyphenation: sco‧re

EtymologyEdit

From English score.

NounEdit

score m (plural scores, diminutive scoretje n)

  1. score (number of points earned)

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

score m (plural scores)

  1. score (in a sport, game)

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Via English score, from Old Norse skor. Related to skera (modern Norwegian Bokmål skjære).

VerbEdit

score (present tense scorer; past tense and past participle scora or scoret)

  1. score (to earn points in a game)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit