rescue

See also: Rescue

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English rescopuen, from Old French rescoure, rescurre, rescorre; from Latin prefix re- (re-) + excuto (to shake or drive out), from ex (out) + quato (I shake).

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PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

rescue (third-person singular simple present rescues, present participle rescuing, simple past and past participle rescued) (transitive)

  1. To save from any violence, danger or evil.
    The well-trained team rescued everyone after the avalanche
  2. To free or liberate from confinement or other physical restraint.
    to rescue a prisoner from the enemy
  3. To recover forcibly
  4. To deliver by arms, notably from a siege
  5. (figuratively) To remove or withdraw from a state of exposure to evil and sin.
    Traditionally missionaries aim to rescue many ignorant heathen souls.
  6. This word needs a definition. Please help out and add a definition, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.
    • 2011 September 13, Sam Lyon, “Borussia Dortmund 1 - 1 Arsenal”, BBC:
      Arsenal's hopes of starting their Champions League campaign with an away win were dashed when substitute Ivan Perisic's superb late volley rescued a point for Borussia Dortmund.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

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Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

NounEdit

rescue (plural rescues)

  1. An act or episode of rescuing, saving.
  2. A liberation, freeing.
  3. The forcible ending of a siege; liberation from similar military peril
    The rescue of Jerusalem was the original motive of the Crusaders
  4. A special airliner flight to bring home passengers who are stranded
  5. A rescuee.
    The dog proved a rescue with some behavior issues.

Usage notesEdit

  • Often used attributively as an adjective, e.g. "rescue equipment".

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.

AnagramsEdit

Last modified on 29 March 2014, at 22:13