Last modified on 27 August 2014, at 11:12
See also: Ruin, rùin, and rúin

EnglishEdit

Ruins at Delphi in Greece

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English ruine, from Old French ruine, from Latin ruīna (overthrow, ruin), from ruō (I fall down, tumble, sink in ruin, rush).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ruin (plural ruins)

  1. (countable, sometimes in the plural) The remains of a destroyed or dilapidated construction, such as a house or castle.
    • Addison
      The Veian and the Gabian towers shall fall, / And one promiscuous ruin cover all; / Nor, after length of years, a stone betray / The place where once the very ruins lay.
    • Buckminster
      The labour of a day will not build up a virtuous habit on the ruins of an old and vicious character.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, “Foreword”, in The China Governess[1]:
      A canister of flour from the kitchen had been thrown at the looking-glass and lay like trampled snow over the remains of a decent blue suit with the lining ripped out which lay on top of the ruin of a plastic wardrobe.
  2. (uncountable) The state of being a ruin, destroyed or decayed.
    The monastery has fallen into ruin.
  3. (uncountable) Something that leads to serious trouble or destruction.
    Gambling has been the ruin of many.
    • Francis Bacon
      The errors of young men are the ruin of business.
  4. (obsolete) A fall or tumble.
    • Chapman
      His ruin startled the other steeds.
  5. A change that destroys or defeats something; destruction; overthrow.
    the ruin of a ship or an army; the ruin of a constitution or a government; the ruin of health or hopes
    • Gray
      Ruin seize thee, ruthless king!

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

ruin (third-person singular simple present ruins, present participle ruining, simple past and past participle ruined)

  1. (transitive) to cause the ruin of.
    • 1883, Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island
      In one way, indeed, he bade fair to ruin us; for he kept on staying week after week, and at last month after month, so that all the money had been long exhausted...
  2. To destroy or make something no longer usable.
    He ruined his new white slacks by accidentally spilling oil on them.
    • Longfellow
      By the fireside there are old men seated, / Seeling ruined cities in the ashes.
  3. To upset or mess up the plans or progress of, or to put into disarray; to spoil.
    My car breaking down just as I was on the road ruined my vacation.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

External linksEdit


AsturianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ruin m sg (feminine singular ruina, neuter singular ruino, masculine plural ruinos, feminine plural ruines)

  1. weedy

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ruin m (plural ruinen, diminutive ruintje n)

  1. gelding

See alsoEdit


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From ruina

AdjectiveEdit

ruin m, f (plural ruines)

  1. contemptible, mean, heartless
  2. mean, stingy

SynonymsEdit



SwedishEdit

NounEdit

ruin c

  1. a ruin (remains of a building)
  2. ruin (financial bankruptcy)

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit