Last modified on 20 October 2014, at 01:02
See also: Wild

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from Old English wilde, from Proto-Germanic *wilþijaz. Compare West Frisian wyld, Dutch wild, German wild, Danish vild.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

wild (comparative wilder, superlative wildest)

  1. Untamed; not domesticated.
    • Shakespeare
      Winter's not gone yet, if the wild geese fly that way.
    • Milton
      The woods and desert caves, / With wild thyme and gadding vine o'ergrown.
    • 2013 May-June, David Van Tassel, Lee DeHaan, “Wild Plants to the Rescue”, American Scientist, volume 101, number 3: 
      Plant breeding is always a numbers game. [] The wild species we use are rich in genetic variation, and individual plants are highly heterozygous and do not breed true. In addition, we are looking for rare alleles, so the more plants we try, the better.
    The island of Chincoteague is famous for its wild horses.
  2. Unrestrained or uninhibited.
    I was filled with wild rage when I discovered the infidelity, and punched a hole in the wall.
  3. Raucous, unruly, or licentious.
    The fraternity was infamous for its wild parties, which frequently resulted in police involvement.
  4. Visibly and overtly anxious; frantic.
    • 2011 August 7, Chris Bevan, “Man City 2-3 Man Utd”, BBC Sport:
      City, in contrast, were lethargic in every area of the pitch and their main contribution in the first half-hour was to keep referee Phil Dowd busy, with Micah Richards among four of their players booked early on, in his case for a wild lunge on Young.
    Her mother was wild with fear when she didn't return home after the party.
  5. Disheveled, tangled, or untidy.
    After a week on the trail without a mirror, my hair was wild and dirty.
  6. Enthusiastic.
    I'm not wild about the idea of a two day car trip with my nephews, but it's my only option.
  7. Inaccurate.
    The novice archer fired a wild shot and hit her opponent's target.
  8. Exposed to the wind and sea; unsheltered.
    a wild roadstead
  9. (nautical) Hard to steer; said of a vessel.
  10. (mathematics, of a knot) Not capable of being represented as a finite closed polygonal chain.

AntonymsEdit

  • (mathematics): tame

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdverbEdit

wild (comparative more wild, superlative most wild)

  1. Inaccurately; not on target.
    The javelin flew wild and struck a spectator, to the horror of all observing.

NounEdit

wild (plural wilds)

  1. The undomesticated state of a wild animal
    After mending the lion's leg, we returned him to the wild
  2. (chiefly in the plural) a wilderness
    • 1730–1774, Oliver Goldsmith, Introductory to Switzerland
      Thus every good his native wilds impart
      Imprints the patriot passion on his heart;
      And e’en those ills that round his mansion rise
      Enhance the bliss his scanty funds supplies.

VerbEdit

wild (third-person singular simple present wilds, present participle wilding, simple past and past participle wilded)

  1. To commit random acts of assault, robbery, and rape in an urban setting, especially as a gang.
    • 1989, David E. Pitt, Jogger's Attackers Terrorized at Least 9 in 2 Hours, New York Times (April 22, 1989), page 1:
      ...Chief of Detectives Robert Colangelo, who said the attacks appeared unrelated to money, race, drugs, or alcohol, said that some of the 20 youths brought in for questioning has told investigators that the crime spree was the product of a pastime called "wilding".
      "It's not a term that we in the police had heard before," the chief said, noting that the police were unaware of any similar incident in the park recently. "They just said, 'We were going wilding.' In my mind at this point, it implies that they were going to raise hell."...

StatisticsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch wild.

AdjectiveEdit

wild (attributive wilde, comparative wilder, superlative wildste)

  1. wild

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch *wildi, from Proto-Germanic *wilþijaz. Compare German wild, West Frisian wyld, English wild, Danish vild.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

wild (comparative wilder, superlative wildst)

  1. wild

DeclensionEdit

NounEdit

wild n (uncountable)

  1. game (food)

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German wildi, from Proto-Germanic *wilþijaz. Compare Dutch wild, English wild, Danish vild.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

wild (comparative wilder, superlative am wildesten)

  1. wild

DeclensionEdit

External linksEdit

  • wild in Duden online

MalteseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Arabic ولد (wálada, to give birth).

NounEdit

wild ?

  1. birth