Last modified on 1 October 2014, at 19:08

trope

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin tropus, from Ancient Greek τρόπος (trópos, a turn, way, manner, style, a trope or figure of speech, a mode in music, a mode or mood in logic), from τροπή (tropḗ, turn; solstice; trope).

NounEdit

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trope (plural tropes)

  1. (literature) Something recurring across a genre or type of literature, such as the ‘mad scientist’ of horror movies or ‘once upon a time’ as an introduction to fairy tales. Similar to archetype and cliché but not necessarily pejorative.
  2. A figure of speech in which words or phrases are used with a nonliteral or figurative meaning, such as a metaphor.
  3. (music) A short cadence at the end of the melody in some early music.
  4. (music) A phrase or verse added to the mass when sung by a choir.
  5. (music) A pair of complementary hexachords in twelve-tone technique.
  6. (Judaism) A cantillation pattern, or the mark that represents it.

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VerbEdit

trope (third-person singular simple present tropes, present participle troping, simple past and past participle troped)

  1. To use, or embellish something with a trope.
  2. (often literature) To turn into, coin or create a new trope.
  3. (often literature) To analyze a work in terms of its literary tropes.
  4. (intransitive) To think or write in terms of tropes.

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FrenchEdit

NounEdit

trope m (plural tropes)

  1. (music, literature, linguistics) trope

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LatinEdit

NounEdit

trope

  1. vocative singular of tropus